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(ELIZABETH CITY, N.C.) -- A sheriff's deputy shot and killed a Black man while executing a search warrant in North Carolina on Wednesday, authorities said.

The shooting occurred at approximately 8:30 a.m. ET as deputies from the Pasquotank County Sheriff's Office attempted to serve the man -- identified as Andrew Brown Jr. -- a search warrant at his home in Elizabeth City, about 170 miles northeast of Raleigh. Brown was fatally wounded during the encounter, according to Pasquotank County Sheriff Tommy Wooten.

"It's been a tragic day," Wooten said at a brief press conference Wednesday.

Wooten told reporters he wasn't sure of Brown's age, but court records show he was 42.

The unnamed deputy who fired the fatal shot has been placed on administrative leave pending a review by the North Carolina State Bureau of Investigation, according to Wooten, who vowed to be "transparent and take the proper actions based on the findings."

"I have put together a team of local law enforcement to come to Pasquotank County to ensure the safety and protection of the citizens in our community," the sheriff said.

The deputy was wearing an active body camera but the sheriff said he will not be releasing the footage at this time.

"We are currently working that right now as hard as we can," Wooten told reporters. "We will be transparent with this situation, absolutely."

Wooten declined to say what the search warrant was for or how many shots were fired.

Masha Rogers, the special agent in charge of the northeastern district of North Carolina State Bureau of Investigation, said investigators will conduct a thorough probe before turning their findings over to Andrew Womble, the district attorney for North Carolina's first prosecutorial district.

"He will make a determination about any criminal charges," Rogers told reporters.

Womble said his office will be looking for "accurate answers and not fast answers."

"This will not be a rush to judgement," Womble told reporters. "We're going to wait for that investigation as we're duty bound to do."

Further details on the shooting were not immediately available.

Brown's death is the latest in a slew of officer-involved shootings of Black men, women and children that have sparked protests nationwide and even overseas. Dozens of people, some holding signs that read "Black Lives Matter" and "Stop Killing Unarmed Black Men," gathered on Wednesday at the scene of the shooting in Elizabeth City and outside City Hall where the City Council held an emergency meeting.

The crowds grew as the sun set, with hundreds blocking traffic on a main thoroughfare of Elizabeth City and another group congregated outside Pasquotank County Sheriff's Office.

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(COLUMBUS, Ohio) -- Police have identified the 16-year-old girl who was shot and killed by a Columbus, Ohio, police officer Tuesday afternoon while he responded to a fight between several girls in a residential neighborhood.

Columbus police responded to 911 calls of a disturbance at 4:30 p.m. local time, with the first officer getting out of his patrol car, approaching the fight and opening fire just seconds later.

The victim was identified late Tuesday as Ma'Khia Bryant. She was taken to the hospital in critical condition and pronounced dead just before 5:30 p.m. The Franklin County Children Services said Bryant was a foster child under its care.

Interim Police Chief Michael Woods identified the officer who shot Bryant as Nicholas Reardon during a press conference Wednesday. He has been with the department since December 2019.

On Wednesday, police shared three new videos from body camera footage of the incident and released audio of the two 911 calls police received from the scene.

Footage from Reardon's body camera shows him exit a police car and approach a scuffle between Bryant and two other girls. In a matter of seconds the cop shoots at Bryant, who appeared to have a knife in her hand, when she lunged toward another girl. He fired what sounded like four shots. A second officer is seen rushing to her side after she fell to the ground.

"She had a knife, she just went at her," Reardon is heard saying in the footage.

"She's just a f------- kid," one bystander at the scene yelled after the shots rang out.

A statement released on behalf of the Bryant family and Ma'Khia's mother, Paula, said they wanted to "respectfully request justice for Ma'Khia Bryant."

"As a family we are all saddened by the tragic and unnecessary death of Ma’Khia," Paula and the Bryant family said in a statement to ABC News. "She was loved by many and had family throughout both Mansfield and in Columbus, Ohio. Ma’Khia was a good student, a good person, and did not deserve what happened to her. We want to remind everyone Ma’Khia was only a 16-year-old teenage girl. We are deeply disturbed by the disproportionate and unjustified use of force in this situation."

The first 911 call came in at 4:32 p.m. In the audio, screaming is heard in the background and a female voice is heard telling dispatchers, "These girls over here trying to fight us, trying to stab us, put their hands on us. Get here now! We need a police officer over here now!" The second caller said police were already at the scene.

The second body camera footage played Wednesday shows an officer arriving to the scene moments before Reardon opened fire and later placing at least three people, including the girls involved in the fight, into police cars. No one was arrested at the scene.

The third officer's footage shows him responding to Bryant after she was shot and an officer starting to perform chest compressions on her.

"Wake up ma'am. Stay with us," an officer is heard saying in the footage.

Woods said Wednesday two police officers performed lifesaving measures on Bryant and a medic was called 90 seconds after shots were fired. The medic arrived six minutes after the shooting and Bryant was transported to a hospital.

When asked why the officer did not use a Taser, Woods said "when officers are faced with someone employing deadly force, deadly force can be the response officers give."

"It's a tragedy. There's no other way to say it. It was a 16-year-old girl. I'm a father, her family is grieving," Woods said.

"She could be my grandchild," Ned Pettus, director of the Columbus Department of Public Safety, said at a press conference Tuesday. "My heart breaks for the family tonight. No matter the circumstances, that family is in agony. ... They deserve answers, the city deserves answers. ... But fast answers cannot come at the expense of accurate answers."

Pettus said if the law was broken the police officer will be held accountable.

Police held a press conference late Tuesday where they showed a small portion of body camera footage of the incident. In the video, the officer is seen approaching a fight involving several teenage girls.

Police said, and the slow motion video appeared to show, that the officer shot the teen just as she was "attempting to stab the first female that lands on the ground and then the second female that is pushed onto the vehicle."

"She was a good kid. She was loving," Hazel Bryant, who said she was the victim's aunt, told Columbus ABC affiliate WSYX-TV near the scene of the shooting. "Yeah, she had issues, but that's OK. ... She didn't deserve to die like a dog on the street."

A review of the shooting will be conducted by the Ohio Bureau of Criminal Investigation.

Columbus Mayor Andrew Ginther confirmed the news of the shooting on Twitter.

"This afternoon a young woman tragically lost her life," he wrote. "We do not know all of the details. There is body-worn camera footage of the incident. We are working to review it as soon as possible. BCI is on the scene conducting an independent investigation -- as they do with all CPD-involved shootings.

"We will share information that we can as soon as it becomes available," he continued. "I'm asking for residents to remain calm and allow BCI to gather the facts."

People gathered near the scene of the shooting as night fell and later marched through Columbus and outside the police department.

The shooting came about an hour before former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin was convicted of second- and third-degree murder in the May 2020 death of George Floyd.

Police initially said Ma'Khia Bryant was 15 years old, but Franklin County Children Services later said she was 16.

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East Lampeter Police Department

(EAST LAMPETER TOWNSHIP, Penn.) -- Investigators have found human remains in a rural Pennsylvania area during the search for an Amish teenager who has been missing for 10 months, authorities said.

Linda Stoltzfoos, 18, was reported missing on June 21 when she did not return from a youth group she was supposed to attend. Investigators believe she was abducted while walking home from church, police said.

On Wednesday, the Lancaster County District Attorney's Office announced that members of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Pennsylvania State Police and the East Lampeter Township Police Department in Lancaster County recovered human remains in a rural area of eastern Lancaster County.

"The scene will be forensically processed, and the remains will then be released to the Lancaster County Coroner for official identification and determination of cause and manner of death," the district attorney's office said in a statement.

Since her disappearance, law enforcement and volunteers have searched over 15,000 hours for Stoltzfoos, according to the district attorney's office.

"The Stoltzfoos family has been notified of this update and are understandably still processing this information," the district attorney's office said Wednesday. "We ask that the family be given privacy during this difficult time."

In July, the East Lampeter Township Police Department charged 34-year-old Justo Smoker with felony kidnapping and misdemeanor false imprisonment in connection with Stoltzfoos' disappearance.

The Lancaster County district attorney also charged Smoker with one count of criminal homicide in December after prosecutors concluded that, based on the teen's continued disappearance, the suspect had allegedly caused her death.

"There was nothing found, no report or evidence, that indicates Linda was planning to leave her home and community," District Attorney Heather Adams said at the time. "And since June 21, there have been no signs of Linda or traces of activity or routines involving Linda."

In March, a judge ruled there was enough evidence to proceed with the homicide charge.

Smoker is incarcerated at Lancaster County Prison awaiting trial. He was ruled ineligible for bail due to the nature of the charges and the ongoing investigation.

During the investigation, authorities obtained and viewed surveillance footage that showed Stoltzfoos on Beechdale Road near the community of Bird-In-Hand, which would have been her walking route back home after church, as well as a red Kia Rio involved in the alleged abduction that fit the description of Smoker's vehicle registration and bumper stickers. Statements from multiple witnesses also allegedly placed Stoltzfoos in Smoker's car, authorities said.

Investigators searched a rural location in Ronks, Pennsylvania, where they believed Stoltzfoos may have been taken following her alleged abduction and found her bra and stockings buried in a wooded area, authorities said. Cellphone evidence showed Smoker allegedly traveled to that site several times, prosecutors said.

Smoker's defense attorney, Lancaster County Chief Public Defender Christopher Tallarico, said in court last month there was no proof that Stoltzfoos had ever gotten into Smoker's car, Harrisburg ABC affiliate WHTM reported.

ABC News' Jon Haworth contributed to this report.

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(THE WOODLANDS, Texas) -- The two victims in the fatal Tesla crash that occurred this past weekend in Texas have been identified as William Varner and Everette Talbot, the local medical examiner's office said Wednesday.

The fiery crash involved a 2019 Tesla Model S car, and local authorities said there is no indication that anyone was in the driver's seat when the car swerved off the road and hit a tree.

The vehicle subsequently burst into flames and burned for over four hours even as firefighters doused it with 30,000 gallons of water. Eventually, firefighters had to let the fire burn itself out.

Varner, 59, was an anesthesiologist who worked at Memorial Hermann The Woodlands Medical Center. The hospital's senior vice president remembered him as a "tremendous human being" in a statement to ABC News on Wednesday.

"Dr. Varner was a tremendous human being who personally impacted many throughout our Memorial Hermann The Woodlands Medical Center family over the years," Justin Kendrick, the medical center's SVP and CEO said. "Our thoughts and prayers go out to his entire family, and also to those who had the privilege of working and serving alongside him in various capacities. He will be dearly missed by so many."

Tony Good, the vice president of communications at U.S. Anesthesia Partners, Varner's official employer, told ABC News on Wednesday that they "were saddened to hear of the death of one of our physicians over the weekend."

"Dr. Varner spent his life caring for others, and now we are focused on caring for his colleagues and family, helping them to cope with this sudden and unexpected loss," Good added.

Further information about Talbot's background was not immediately available. ABC News' local affiliate KTRK-TV in Houston reported that he was a 69-year-old engineer and friends with Varner.

Earlier this week, the National Transportation Safety Board and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration announced in separate statements that both federal agencies were sending teams to help investigate the fatal crash.

The vehicle had an autopilot option, and investigators are working to determine if it was in use at the time of the crash.

Harris County Precinct 4 Constable Mark Herman told ABC News earlier this week that one victim was found in the front passenger seat and the other in the backseat -- meaning that nobody appeared to be in the driver's seat operating the vehicle.

Tesla's chief executive Elon Musk replied to a Twitter comment on a Wall Street Journal article about the crash earlier this week to say that he doesn't believe autopilot was on during the crash.

"Data logs recovered so far show Autopilot was not enabled & this car did not purchase FSD [Full Self Driving software]," Musk wrote on Monday. "Moreover, standard Autopilot would require lane lines to turn on, which this street did not have."

On Wednesday, the electric vehicle tycoon responded to another tweet featuring a video of automotive engineer Sandy Munro touting the safety of Tesla's autopilot function.

"Sandy Munro knows what he’s talking about," he wrote.

Meanwhile, Constable Herman told KTRK that investigators are "100% sure" that no one was driving the vehicle at the time of the crash.

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(WASHINGTON) -- The Department of Homeland Security's inspector general released a report Wednesday saying DHS had the legal authority to deploy agents and officers to Portland, Oregon, last summer but did not have a comprehensive strategy and was "unprepared."

DHS deployed Customs and Border Protection agents to Portland, Oregon, in the summer of 2020 to protect the federal courthouse after nights of protests in the aftermath of George Floyd's murder.

It did so under the legal authority to assist the Federal Protective Service (FPS), the new report says. FPS protects federal buildings such as courthouses. At the time, then-Acting Secretary Chad Wolf slammed the governor and mayor of Oregon for not properly protecting the courthouse.

But the report also said DHS was not up to the task and that "not all officers were properly trained to respond to riots and to conduct crowd control operations."

"DHS was unprepared to effectively execute cross-component activities to protect Federal facilities when component law enforcement officers first deployed on June 4, 2020," the report said. "Specifically, not all officers completed required training; had the necessary equipment; and used consistent uniforms, devices, and operational tactics when responding to the events in Portland."

In total, DHS deployed 755 people to Portland last summer, including Federal Protective Service, Customs and Border Protection, Immigration and Customs Enforcement and Secret Service personnel. Out of the 222 agents deployed, 36 were not properly trained, according to the report.

The report found that 14 of the 36 officers who were not properly trained used a non-lethal weapon against a person in Portland.

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(MINNEAPOLIS) -- Derek Chauvin’s legal battle is far from over.

The nation watched with bated breath on Tuesday as the former Minnesota police officer was found guilty of second-degree murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter in the May 25, 2020, death of George Floyd in Minneapolis.

Chauvin will have 90 days to appeal the verdict, under Minnesota law, and it could take about a year for the appeal to run its course, according to Paul Applebaum, a Minnesota criminal defense lawyer.

Following the verdict, Judge Peter Cahill announced Chauvin’s sentencing hearing will take place in eight weeks.

Chauvin will only be sentenced on the second-degree murder charge because, per state law, if a defendant is convicted of two or more felony offenses from the same incident, the defendant is punished for the “most serious” of the offenses.

The maximum sentence for second-degree murder is 40 years in prison, but Minnesota sentencing guidelines suggest he's more likely to receive up to 15 years, based on his lack of a prior criminal record.

All three charges are eligible for appeal under Minnesota state law -- Chauvin could request the verdict be overturned and he be granted a new trial

Chauvin could seek to challenge the verdict based on a number of grounds, including arguing the jury was prejudiced by intense media coverage of the case and the $27 million settlement won by George Floyd’s family to settle a civil lawsuit filed over his death. That settlement was reached during jury selection.

After the settlement was announced, Chauvin’s defense attorney Eric Nelson requested a delay in the trial or a change of venue, arguing the settlement had an “incredible propensity to taint a jury pool." Cahill denied that request on March 19.

Cahill’s ruling to not move the trial or delay proceedings could be challenged as part of the appeal. The decision to sequester the jury for only deliberations could also be an appellate issue.

"Most of the arguments are going to center around the publicity, because being downtown Minneapolis, it was like the Green Zone in Iraq where the U.S. military was living. I've never seen anything like that -- Rodney King wasn't like that, O.J. Simpson wasn't like that," Applebaum told ABC News.

"First you have the pretrial publicity, which was horrific if you're the defendant. For almost one year, it's just been a daily barrage of negative emotions and feelings towards the defendant. Then you'd have the $27 million settlement on the eve of the trial, which is horrific for the defendant in terms of the City of Minneapolis, his employer, giving $27 million payout for his conduct," he added.

Another strategy in the appeal could be pointing out the uproar over the fatal police shooting of Daunte Wright on April 11 in the Minneapolis suburb, which reignited protests in the state.

Chauvin's attorney could also cite comments from California Rep. Maxine Waters, who urged protesters over the weekend to “get more confrontational” if Chauvin was found not guilty -- a comment Nelson used to request a mistrial. Cahill denied that motion but admitted the comments were controversial.

“I’ll give you that Congresswoman Waters may have given you something on appeal that may result on this whole trial being overturned,” Cahill said.

"All of these things most certainly have spilled over into the trial," Applebaum said. "Prosecutors will probably argue it doesn't matter where we try, this evidence was so overwhelming. No amount of negative publicity would change the verdict."

Chauvin's lawyers could also focus the appeal on challenging the third-degree murder charge. Under Minnesota law, third-degree murder is defined as an act committed “without intent to effect the death of any person, causes the death of another by perpetrating an act eminently dangerous to others and evincing a depraved mind, without regard for human life.”

Former Minneapolis police officer Mohamed Noor, who was convicted of third-degree murder in the 2017 death of Justine Ruszczyk Damond, filed an appeal on that charge with the Minnesota Supreme Court.

Noor’s appeal, which is still pending, will focus on if a person can be convicted of third-degree murder if the actions of the defendant only targeted a single individual, not multiple, and if recklessness of the action warrants charges of “evincing a depraved mind,” according to the Star Tribune.

While Noor could argue that his actions only targeted Damond and no one else, Chauvin could similarly argue that he didn’t harm any bystanders in Floyd’s death.

The original charges against Chauvin included third-degree murder, but Judge Cahill threw out that count in October, saying prosecutors could not show probable cause that Chauvin's actions put people other than Floyd at risk. Prosecutors fought to include the charge and the Minnesota Court of Appeals ordered Cahill to reexamine the third-degree charge saying the application of the count in Noor’s case established a precedent and in March Cahill reinstated the charge. However, this may not be an effective route to pursue as Chauvin was also found guilty of unintentional second-degree murder, a more serious charge.

Despite having a number of ways to challenge the verdict, the statistics suggest Chauvin has an uphill battle. The National Post-Conviction Project, a nonprofit, says 90% of civil and criminal appeals are denied in the United States.

Applebaum said Chauvin's prospects for a successful appeal are slim.

"Chances are slim to none and slim just left town," he said.

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(MINNEAPOLIS) -- People across the United States responded to the guilty verdict that was reached in the murder trial of former Minnesota police officer Derek Chauvin, who was charged in the death of George Floyd.

Chauvin was found guilty on all counts.

Here's how the news is developing. All times Eastern:

Apr 21, 1:13 pm
UN High Commissioner for Human Rights: 'We need to ... dismantle systemic racism'

The UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, Michelle Bachelet, said in a statement Wednesday that "any other result" in this case "would have been a travesty of justice."

Going forward, she said, "We need to see robust measures to prevent further arbitrary killings."

"As we have painfully witnessed in recent days and weeks, reforms to policing departments across the U.S. continue to be insufficient to stop people of African descent from being killed," Bachelet said. "It is time to move on from talk of reform to truly rethinking policing."

She continued, "This case has also helped reveal, perhaps more clearly than ever before, how much remains to be done to reverse the tide of systemic racism that permeates the lives of people of African descent. We need to move to whole-of-government and whole-of-society approaches that dismantle systemic racism."

Apr 21, 12:20 pm
Nation's largest police union: 'It’s time for an honest discussion'

Patrick Lynch, president of the nation's largest police union, the Police Benevolent Association of the City of New York, said in a statement, "As we have said from the beginning, what Derek Chauvin did that day was not policing. It was murder."

Going forward, Lynch said, "It's time for an honest discussion of policing and public safety that begins with the real challenges we face on our streets."

Apr 21, 10:15 am
AG announces civil investigation into Minneapolis Police Department

The Justice Department is launching a civil investigation into the Minneapolis Police Department to determine whether the police department has a pattern or practice of unconstitutional or unlawful policing, Attorney General Merrick Garland announced Wednesday.

The investigation will assess whether the department "engages in a pattern or practice of using excessive force, including during protests," and will "assess whether the MPD engages in discriminatory conduct, and whether its treatment of those with behavioral health disabilities is unlawful," Garland said. "It will include a comprehensive review of the Minneapolis Police Department's policies, training, supervision, and use of force investigations."

"Accountability is an essential part of building trust with the community," Garland said. "Public safety requires public trust."

"Justice is sometimes slow, sometimes elusive and sometimes never comes," he said. "The Department of Justice will be unwavering in its pursuit of equal justice."

Apr 20, 11:15 pm
Minneapolis police chief: 'I respect the process and the decision'  

In a statement Thursday night, Minneapolis Police Chief Medaria Arradondo reacted to the verdict reached in the Derek Chauvin trial, which found one of the department's former officers guilty in the murder of George Floyd.

"I want to acknowledge and thank the jurors on this case for their immense responsibility and honorable civic duty," he said. "The verdict has been read and I respect the process and the decision."

The chief took the moment to thank the members of the force and their families.

"The past year has been difficult and challenging, yet they have continued to show up and serve our community with the respect and dignity they deserve," he said.

Arradondo asked for "calm, safety and peace in our communities" in the wake of the verdict, and said the department will "strive to do our very best to earn your trust."

The chief was one of the highest-profile witnesses to testify for the prosecution during the trial. He told jurors that Chauvin violated numerous use-of-force and ethics policies in the fatal arrest of Floyd.

Apr 20, 10:54 pm
Celebrities, athletes react to the Chauvin verdict

In the wake of the Derek Chauvin guilty verdict, several celebrities and athletes took to social media to react.

NBA star LeBron James summed it up in one word: "Accountability."

U.S. Open champ Naomi Osaka, who wore masks with the names of victims of racial injustice and police brutality during the tournament, including Floyd's, said she was "hit with sadness because we are celebrating something that is clear as day."

Oprah Winfrey tweeted a photo of a young Floyd, saying she was "relieved" and "cried tears of joy as each verdict was read."

TV producer Shonda Rhimes said the verdict "does not bring back Mr Floyd. But justice is truth."

Whoopi Goldberg had a similar sentiment. "No one wins," she tweeted. "George Floyd is still gone."

Black-ish star Tracee Ellis Ross said she is "weeping with grief and relief for George’s family, his loved ones, and this country."

Model Bella Hadid shared a photo of Floyd with his daughter, saying, "Thank God for justice and accountability today."

Actor George Takei, paraphrasing Martin Luther King Jr., tweeted that "the moral arc of the universe has finally bent toward" justice.

Singer Barbra Streisand thanked the jury and the high schooler, Darnella Frazier, who filmed the viral video of the "horrible act."

Apr 21, 10:15 am
AG announces civil investigation into Minneapolis Police Department

The Justice Department is launching a civil investigation into the Minneapolis Police Department to determine whether the police department has a pattern or practice of unconstitutional or unlawful policing, Attorney General Merrick Garland announced Wednesday.

"Accountability is an essential part of building trust with the community," Garland said. "Public safety requires public trust."

"Justice is sometimes slow, sometimes elusive and sometimes never comes," he said. "The Department of Justice will be unwavering in its pursuit of equal justice."

Apr 20, 11:15 pm
Minneapolis police chief: 'I respect the process and the decision'  

In a statement Thursday night, Minneapolis Police Chief Medaria Arradondo reacted to the verdict reached in the Derek Chauvin trial, which found one of the department's former officers guilty in the murder of George Floyd.

"I want to acknowledge and thank the jurors on this case for their immense responsibility and honorable civic duty," he said. "The verdict has been read and I respect the process and the decision."

The chief took the moment to thank the members of the force and their families.

"The past year has been difficult and challenging, yet they have continued to show up and serve our community with the respect and dignity they deserve," he said.

Arradondo asked for "calm, safety and peace in our communities" in the wake of the verdict, and said the department will "strive to do our very best to earn your trust."

The chief was one of the highest-profile witnesses to testify for the prosecution during the trial. He told jurors that Chauvin violated numerous use-of-force and ethics policies in the fatal arrest of Floyd.

Apr 20, 10:54 pm
Celebrities, athletes react to the Chauvin verdict

In the wake of the Derek Chauvin guilty verdict, several celebrities and athletes took to social media to react.

NBA star LeBron James summed it up in one word: "Accountability."

U.S. Open champ Naomi Osaka, who wore masks with the names of victims of racial injustice and police brutality during the tournament, including Floyd's, said she was "hit with sadness because we are celebrating something that is clear as day."

Oprah Winfrey tweeted a photo of a young Floyd, saying she was "relieved" and "cried tears of joy as each verdict was read."

TV producer Shonda Rhimes said the verdict "does not bring back Mr Floyd. But justice is truth."

Whoopi Goldberg had a similar sentiment. "No one wins," she tweeted. "George Floyd is still gone."

Black-ish star Tracee Ellis Ross said she is "weeping with grief and relief for George’s family, his loved ones, and this country."

Model Bella Hadid shared a photo of Floyd with his daughter, saying, "Thank God for justice and accountability today."

Actor George Takei, paraphrasing Martin Luther King Jr., tweeted that "the moral arc of the universe has finally bent toward" justice.

Singer Barbra Streisand thanked the jury and the high schooler, Darnella Frazier, who filmed the viral video of the "horrible act."

Apr 20, 8:40 pm
Mayor: 'This is a good day in Minneapolis'

Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey described a city "gripped in grief" in the 11 months since George Floyd died while in police custody, as many residents took to the streets Tuesday to celebrate the verdict in the Derek Chauvin trial.

"This is a good day in Minneapolis," Frey said during a press briefing a few hours after the verdict was announced. "But let me be exceedingly clear: This is day one."

"Justice has been rendered in this case, but we still have a long way to go to achieve true justice in our city and in our country," he said, noting that the city is "piloting new ways of policing" in the wake of George Floyd's death.

The mayor said he was "relieved" by the verdict, and thanked the jurors and witnesses who testified.

"We all wanted to see justice, we all wanted to make sure that, again, this was day one of the necessary change that we needed to see," Frey said. "And I think we all were nervous that what has happened on so many occasions, through our judicial system, where we wouldn't see that justice would happen."

The verdict comes as the city is also reeling from the fatal police shooting of Daunte Wright while being detained by police last week in Brooklyn Center, a Minneapolis suburb. The shooting sparked widespread protests.

A curfew has not been issued for Tuesday night, "although that certainly remains an option on the table if necessary," Frey said. "That is not the desired approach, but it is an option that will be available."

Apr 20, 8:12 pm
DHS Secretary: 'This conviction is a step toward accountability'

Department of Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas weighed in on the conviction of Derek Chauvin on Twitter, Tuesday night.

Mayorkas said the verdict was "a step toward accountability," but said "it will not erase the pain felt by the Floyd family and Black Americans."

"I speak for myself and the entire Department of Homeland Security in reaffirming our commitment to do our part to end injustice as we work to make our country a safer and more equitable Nation for all," he tweeted.

Maorkas added that DHS is in contact with state and local agencies to ensure that citizens peacefully make their voices heard.

-ABC News' Luke Barr

Apr 20, 7:49 pm
Biden, Harris deliver address from the White House

President Joe Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris reacted to the verdict in the Derek Chauvin trial in an address from the White House.

Biden called the guilty verdict a "giant step forward in the march toward justice in America" and commended the witnesses who testified, including police officers.

"Most men and women who wear the badge serve their communities honorably. Those few who failed to meet that standard must be held accountable, and they were today. One was," Biden said. "No one should be above the law. And today's verdict sends that message."

"But it's not enough," he continued. "We can't stop here. In order to deliver a real change in reform, we can and we must do more to reduce the likelihood that tragedy like this will ever happen to occur again."

Harris called the verdict a step forward in law enforcement reform.

"A measure of justice isn’t the same as equal justice," she said. "We still have work to do."

Harris said she and Biden will continue to urge the Senate to pass the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act.

"Black men are fathers and brothers and sons and uncles and grandfathers and friends and neighbors," she said. "Their lives must be valued in our education system, in our health care system, in our housing system, in our economic system, in our criminal justice system, in our nation -- full stop."

Apr 20, 7:45 pm
Jury 'fulfilled' its duty: Attorney General Merrick Garland

U.S. Attorney General Merrick Garland weighed on Tuesday's verdict, stating the jury "has fulfilled its civic duty."

"While the state’s prosecution was successful, I know that nothing can fill the void that the loved ones of George Floyd have felt since his death," he said in a statement.

Garland added that the Justice Department's civil rights investigation into Floyd's death is still ongoing.

Apr 20, 6:55 pm
Senate Judiciary Committee announces police reform hearing

U.S. Senate Majority Whip Dick Durbin, who chairs the Judiciary Committee, said in a statement that he plans to hold a hearing on police reform next month, citing the Floyd case.

"The verdict of this jury gives me hope that we can strive for a system of justice in our nation that is applied equally to all," he said in a statement.

"As Chair of the Senate Judiciary Committee, I have the forum and the means to help move our nation nearer to that goal."

-ABC News' Trish Turner

Apr 20, 6:48 pm
Teen who filmed viral video of arrest: 'George Floyd we did it'

The teenager who filmed George Floyd's arrest and testified in court reacted after Derek Chauvin was found guilty of all three charges in his death.

"I just cried so hard," Darnella Frazier, 18, said in a social media post shortly after the verdict was announced. "This last hour my heart was beating so fast, I was so anxious."

"George Floyd we did it!!" she said. "Justice has been served."

Frazier, a high school student, was walking to Cup Foods with her 9-year-old cousin to buy some snacks on May 25, 2020, when they witnessed police officers pinning down Floyd.

Frazier said she immediately began recording the incident with her cellphone.

"He was in pain," Frazier said of Floyd during her testimony the first week of the trial. "It seemed like, he knew ... he knew it was over for him. He was terrified. He was suffering. This was a cry for help."

During her emotional, tearful testimony, Frazier said she has spent nights agonizing over what she saw.

"I stayed up apologizing and apologizing to George Floyd for not doing more and not physically interacting, not saving his life," she testified.

ABC News' Bill Hutchinson contributed to this report.

Apr 20, 6:38 pm
Obama calls verdict ‘right thing,’ highlights activists’ work

“Today, a jury in Minneapolis did the right thing,” former President Barack Obama and former First Lady Michelle Obama said in a joint statement.

But the Obamas also said “true justice is about much more than a single verdict in a single trial.”

“True justice requires that we come to terms with the fact that Black Americans are treated differently, every day,” they wrote. “It requires us to recognize that millions of our friends, family, and fellow citizens live in fear that their next encounter with law enforcement could be their last. And it requires us to do the sometimes thankless, often difficult, but always necessary work of making the America we know more like the America we believe in.”

The Obamas said the verdict was a “necessary step,” but noted that concrete reforms to reduce and eliminate racial bias in the criminal justice system and efforts to expand economic opportunity for marginalized communities are needed.

“And as we continue the fight, we can draw strength from the millions of people — especially young people — who have marched and protested and spoken up over the last year, shining a light on inequity and calling for change. Justice is closer today not simply because of this verdict, but because of their work,” they wrote.

Apr 20, 6:35 pm
Minnesota attorney general: Verdict is not 'justice'

Minnesota Attorney General Keith Ellison, the lead prosecutor in the Derek Chauvin murder trial, measuredly addressed his victory shortly after the jury delivered its guilty verdict.

"I would not call today's verdict justice, however, because justice implies true restoration," Ellison told reporters outside the Hennepin County Government Center. "But it is accountability, which is the first step towards justice."

Ellison thanked the witnesses who testified on behalf of the prosecution, including the bystanders to Floyd's arrest on May 25, 2020, whom he referred to as a "bouquet of humanity."

"They didn't know George Floyd," he said. "They stopped and raised their voices, and they even challenged authority, because they saw his humanity. They stopped and they raised their voices because they knew that what they were seeing was wrong. They didn't need to be medical professionals or experts in the use of force. They know what was wrong. And they were right."

Ellison also addressed Floyd's family, who had to "relive again and again the worst day of their lives."

"I'm profoundly grateful to them for giving us the time we needed to prosecute this case," Ellison said. "They have shown the world what grace and class and encourage really look like. Although verdict alone cannot heal their pain, I hope it's another step on the long path toward healing for them.

To the 14 members of the jury, Ellison thanked them for their time and attention "to carefully listen to the evidence."

"They answered the call, and they served in a landmark trial," he said, and asked that people respect their privacy if they so desire.

Ellison referred to his legal team as "all Michael Jordans."

"We presented the best case that we could, and the jury heard us, and we're grateful for that," he said. "We had the sole burden of proof in the case, and history shows that winning cases like these can be difficult."

With sentencing in the coming weeks, the attorney general said "this is not the end." He also said his office expects to present another case, but did not go into any detail.

Apr 20, 6:25 pm
Congressional Black Caucus vows to press forward on police reform

Members of the Congressional Black Caucus reacted to the guilty verdict in the Derek Chauvin case outside the Capitol on Tuesday, welcoming the news while vowing to press forward with police reform.

"This verdict we certainly agree with, guilty on all charges," Chair Joyce Beatty, D-Ohio, said. "But we want our message to be very clear that this is just the first step. We know clearly that justice has been delayed."

Freshman Rep. Cori Bush, D-Mo., said the verdict "should be the regular thing" rather than a surprise international news headline. "All we’re doing is saying our lives matter."

“Step one is the verdict, step two is the sentencing,” Rep. Karen Bass, D-Calif., a leader of police reform legislation negotiations, added. "Now we have to focus on transforming policing in the United States."

-ABC News' Ben Siegel

Apr 20, 6:25 pm
Congressional Black Caucus vows to press forward on police reform

Members of the Congressional Black Caucus reacted to the guilty verdict in the Derek Chauvin case outside the Capitol on Tuesday, welcoming the news while vowing to press forward with police reform.

"This verdict we certainly agree with, guilty on all charges," Chair Joyce Beatty, D-Ohio, said. "But we want our message to be very clear that this is just the first step. We know clearly that justice has been delayed."

Freshman Rep. Cori Bush, D-Mo., said the verdict "should be the regular thing" rather than a surprise international news headline. "All we’re doing is saying our lives matter."

“Step one is the verdict, step two is the sentencing,” Rep. Karen Bass, D-Calif., a leader of police reform legislation negotiations, added. "Now we have to focus on transforming policing in the United States."

-ABC News' Ben Siegel

Apr 20, 6:08 pm
Demonstrators in Minneapolis react

People gathered Tuesday afternoon outside of the Hennepin County Government Center and at George Floyd Square in Minneapolis to hear the verdict.

While some who were gathered were celebratory, others were tearful upon learning that Chauvin was found guilty on all of the counts against him.

Police departments across the United States have been bracing for this moment. A state of emergency was declared, and National Guard tro

Apr 20, 5:48 pm
The moment George Floyd’s family heard the verdict

As George Floyd’s family watched the verdict being read, they were overcome with emotion.

Bystander video footage shown in court showed Floyd talking about his family while laying on the pavement under Chauvin’s knee.

“Can’t believe this, man. Mom, love you. Love you. Tell my kids I love them. I’m dead,” he said.

Apr 20, 5:37 pm
A 'turning point in American history,' Floyd family lawyer says

Ben Crump, one of the attorneys for George Floyd's family that helped settle a $27 million civil lawsuit last month, called the Derek Chauvin case a "turning point in American history for accountability of law enforcement," after the former Minneapolis police officer was convicted on all three counts in Floyd's death.

"Painfully earned justice has arrived for George Floyd’s family and the community here in Minneapolis, but today’s verdict goes far beyond this city and has significant implications for the country and even the world," Crump said in a statement. "But it does not end here. We have not forgotten that the other three officers who played their own roles in the death of George Floyd must still be held accountable for their actions, as well."

Antonio M. Romanucci, another attorney on the legal team, said in a statement the verdict "reinforces significant police reforms underway in Minneapolis including use-of-force reporting, a requirement to keep body-worn cameras on, and a policy for officers to de-escalate non-threatening encounters by disengaging or walking away."

He called on Minnesota state lawmakers to pass The George Floyd Arbitration Reform Bill, and for the United States Senate to pass the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act.

In March, Minneapolis' City Council approved a $27 million settlement to the family of George Floyd.

Apr 20, 5:29 pm
Minnesota governor calls verdict an ‘important step forward’

Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz released a statement on Facebook after the verdict was read, calling it an “important step forward for justice in Minnesota.” However, he noted, the death of Daunte Wright on April 11 is a reminder that “our work has only begun.”

“A year later, Derek Chauvin has been found guilty of murder and faces years behind bars,” Walz wrote. “But we know that accountability in the courtroom is only the first step.”

“No verdict can bring George back, and my heart is with his family as they continue to grieve his loss. Minnesota mourns with you, and we promise the pursuit of justice for George does not end today,” he continued.

“True justice for George only comes through real, systemic change to prevent this from happening again,” Walz said. “And the tragic death of Daunte Wright this week serves as a heartbreaking reminder that we still have so much more work to do to get there.”

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(NEW YORK) -- One of George Floyd's brothers says he was struck watching former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin put his hands behind his back to be placed into handcuffs after the guilty verdicts were read.

"I watched him put his hands behind his back -- he had it a lot easier than my brother because my brother's hands were pinned backwards," Philonise Floyd told ABC News' Good Morning America on Wednesday.

As Philonise Floyd awaited the verdict, he said, "Inside that courtroom I prayed for like 30 minutes -- because it took 30 minutes for the jurors and the judge to come out."

He said Chauvin's conviction "makes us happier knowing that his life, it mattered and he didn't die in vain."

"It was accountability," he said of the verdict.

Chauvin was convicted Tuesday on all counts against him in connection to George Floyd's death: second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter.

Philonise Floyd said his brother's death "made people realize that people's lives matter."

"All across the world, not just here in Minneapolis," he said, "people, they marched for him, protested for him."

"Gianna, [George Floyd's 7-year-old daughter] she said her dad would change the world. And I think that we will be able to cement his legacy because he did just that -- he changed the world," Philonise Floyd said. "He brought everybody across this country together for one purpose and that was to make sure that these officers be held accountable."

Floyd family attorney Ben Crump added on GMA that he hopes this case sets a precedent "where liberty and justice for all" applies "to all Americans."

Crump said passing the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act is the next step "to prevent some of these unnecessary killings."

Philonise Floyd said, "I'm just happy that we will have the opportunity to cement his legacy, and hopefully the George Floyd Policing Act will be passed, because people's blood is on that bill. And these people, they need to have justice for what happened to their families."

As for the other three officers charged in connection to George Floyd's death, Philonise Floyd added on ABC's The View Wednesday, "They need to be held accountable, because, if the roles were reversed, that's what would happen to me."

"Any time you commit a crime, all people who are there, should all be held accountable," he said. "They all should be locked up together because my brother is doing time in the ground, and they all need to be doing time in a cell."

The other three officers, who are awaiting trial, are charged with aiding and abetting second-degree murder and aiding and abetting second-degree manslaughter.

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(CHICAGO) -- Plans for former President Barack Obama's presidential library are underway in his hometown of Chicago's South Side.

"We hope it will help lift up the South Side and breathe new life into Jackson Park and the surrounding communities," former President Obama said in a tweet.

Mayor Lori Lightwood announced $500 million plans to create the Obama Presidential Center in the historic South Side Jackson Park.

"It's really a transformative development for the city of Chicago," Deputy Mayor of Economic and Neighborhood Development Samir Mayekar told ABC News.

The Chicago's South Side is home to a diverse urban community made up of many minorities and is not the typical location for a presidential library or presidential center, but Mayekar said that is the point.

"One of the things we've really been focused on under Mayor Lori Lightfood's leadership is really thinking about all of the communities that surround the Obama Presidential Center ... it will bring hundreds of millions of dollars into a community in a way that will generate more jobs more opportunity and more hope for the residents of the South Side," Mayekar said.

The project follows a four-year federal review, lawsuits, and concerns by activists of possible gentrification.

The library and center is expected to become a major tourist attraction and moneymaker for the city, which could potentially make the area unaffordable for some of its current residents.

In efforts to curb potential gentrification, Illinois passed a housing preservation ordinance that provides $10 million in financing to help preserve affordability in the communities around the Obama Presidential Community Center.

"It was really important to make sure we're making substantial investments in affordable housing because as you can imagine any time you have a tremendous catalytic development, there's always displacement concerns," Mayekar said.

Plans for the Center

Plans for the center include play areas, a four-building campus, underground parking, open space for walking and bike paths.

The center is set to be built around the site of the 1893 World's Columbian Exposition which was once a site for the World Fair, and "put Chicago on the road map," according to Mayekar.

"It's only fitting that the next, tremendous milestone that happens on the South Side of this magnitude, happens in historic Jackson Park with the Obama Center," Mayekar said.

Work for the library officially begins in mid-September 2021.

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(WEST HEMPSTEAD, N.Y.) -- One employee was killed and two others were injured in a shooting allegedly carried out by a "troubled" coworker at an office of a Stop & Shop supermarket in West Hempstead, New York, on Tuesday, police said.

The victim who died was 49-year-old Ray Wishropp, who worked as a manager, police said.

The survivors were a 50-year-old man and a 26-year-old woman, police said. Both are recovering in the hospital, police said Wednesday.

The suspect, Gabriel Dewitt Wilson, is in custody.

Wilson, 31, was a "troubled employee" who in previous months allegedly made "unwanted advances" toward a female coworker, police said at a news conference Wednesday. Wilson also allegedly had disputes with coworkers; some complained he was "threatening," police said.

Wilson's job was to collect carts in the supermarket lot, police said.

On Tuesday morning, Wilson allegedly went into the office and spoke to a manager about transferring to another Stop & Shop store, police said.

Wilson was non-confrontational in that conversation, but then allegedly returned to the building 40 minutes later and opened fire, police said.

Wilson came back at 11:19 a.m. and went straight to a second-floor office where he allegedly shot the man and woman who survived, police said. He then allegedly went to another office where he shot and killed a manager, police said.

Wilson allegedly fired seven times at five different people, police said.

A couple hundred shoppers were in the store at the time, Nassau County Police Commissioner Patrick Ryder said.

Wilson fled the scene and was apprehended Tuesday afternoon following an hours-long search.

During the search, authorities asked residents to stay indoors as they canvassed the area. The West Hempstead School District was on a "lock out," meaning people weren't allowed into school buildings.

The gun has not been recovered, police said.

Wilson was previously arrested for assault, attempt to distribute narcotics, attempted murder and possession of a firearm, police said.

Wilson has also been the subject of two mental health crisis calls, police said.

Wilson was charged with second-degree murder and four counts of attempted murder, police said. He was arraigned Wednesday and remanded, prosecutors said. He will return to court on Friday.

Police noted that this shooting came on the anniversary of the Columbine High School mass shooting.

"We are shocked and heartbroken by this act of violence," Gordon Reid, president of Stop & Shop, said in a statement.

"Our hearts go out to the families of the victims, our associates, customers and the first responders who have responded heroically to this tragic situation," he said. "At this time, we are cooperating fully with local law enforcement on the investigation. The store will remain closed until further notice, and we appreciate the Long Island community's support during this difficult time."

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said in a statement: "I'm praying for the victims, and my heart breaks for their families and loved ones."

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(NEW YORK) -- Last May, Judeah Reynolds, then 9, asked her older cousin to take her to get snacks in Minneapolis. They both ended up witnessing the death of George Floyd.

Nearly one year later, Judeah, now 10, testified in the murder trial of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin, who was found guilty Tuesday of second-degree murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter in the death of Floyd.

Judeah told ABC News' Good Morning America co-anchor Robin Roberts in an interview Wednesday that she watched the guilty verdict being read on TV alongside her parents.

"My mom said that we brought change. My dad said, ‘We won,'" said Judeah, adding that she herself felt "kind of proud."

The now-famous video of Floyd pleading for his life while Chauvin pressed his left knee on the back of Floyd's neck was taken by Judeah's cousin, then 17-year-old high school student Darnella Frazier.

The video shot by Darnella was described as the "biggest piece of evidence" in the trial by Dr. Ziv Cohen, a clinical assistant professor of psychiatry at Cornell University.

Judeah's own words were also important to the trial that prosecutor Jerry Blackwell highlighted them in his closing arguments.

"Ultimately, it really isn't that complicated," Blackwell told jurors this week. "And what it is you have to decide is so simple that a child could understand it. In fact, a child did understand it when the 9-year-old girl said, 'Get off of him.' That's how simple it was. 'Get off of him.' Common sense."

Latoya Turk, a family friend who was with Judeah in court, told GMA that were it not for Judeah, the jurors and the world would likely not have seen Floyd's final pleas for his life.

"I think for the family we absolutely know that if not for Judeah we wouldn’t have been in that position at that time, so if not for Judeah there would have been no walk to the store for snacks and the video," she said. "For Judeah, I don’t think she realizes the magnitude that she has changed the world."

Judeah's family has focused in the past year on protecting their daughter's mental health and keeping her life as normal as possible, according to Turk.

The 10-year-old is now writing a children's book, Judeah’s Walk to the Store, about her experience.

Judeah said she hopes the book will inspire people to "be brave and bring change into their story."

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(NEW YORK) -- Record-breaking snow and cold are moving through the U.S., with some places not seeing so much snow this late in the season in recorded history.

Kansas City, Missouri, saw a record-breaking 3.5 inches of snow Tuesday.

Paducah, Kentucky, measured half an inch of snow, making it the latest measurable snow ever recorded in the city.

In addition to historic late-season snow, temperatures Wednesday morning are falling to record low levels.

Some of the dozens of record lows Wednesday morning include Indianapolis at 21 degrees, Dallas at 38 degrees and Oklahoma City at 30 degrees.

From New Mexico to Connecticut, much of the U.S. is under a freeze warning and frost advisory as this unseasonably cold air mass moves east.

Some of the wind chills Wednesday morning are in the teens and single digits in the Plains and the Rockies.

The coldest air will move into the Northeast and the East Coast Thursday morning, with wind chills dipping to the teens and single digits in western and northern New York.

Ahead of this storm system, warm air could help to produce severe thunderstorms from Norfolk, Virginia, to New York City and Springfield, Massachusetts, on Wednesday.

The biggest threat with these storms Wednesday afternoon will be damaging winds, but an isolated tornado cannot be ruled out, especially along the Hudson Valley and in southern New England.

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(NEW YORK) -- Nearly one year after the death of George Floyd in Minnesota, protesters have taken to the streets again in wake of the fatal shooting of Daunte Wright -- and after promises of police reform by the state's governor and other officials.

Since Floyd's death on May 25, for which former Minneapolis Police Officer Derek Chauvin was found guilty Tuesday of second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter charges after pressing his knee into Floyd's neck for over nine minutes, Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz said he would demand the state legislature hold hearings to consider several police reforms passed in other states.

While there has been slow momentum in police reform since Floyd's death, activists say Walz and local lawmakers who have ignored their bills are now coming to the table to hear them out -- days after Wright's death.

Another death while awaiting reform

Daunte Wright, a 20-year-old Black man and father to a 2-year-old, was shot in the chest and killed during a traffic stop in Brooklyn Center on April 11.

The shooting happened less than 10 miles from the Minneapolis courthouse where the Chauvin trial took place.

In the Wright case, former Brooklyn Center Police Officer Kim Potter, a 26-year veteran of the force, meant to draw her stun gun but accidentally drew her firearm and shot Wright, according to then-Brooklyn Center Police Chief Tim Gannon.

Potter and Gannon offered their resignations two days after the incident. On April 14, three days after Wright was killed, Potter was arrested and charged with second-degree manslaughter. She posted $100,000 bail and was released hours later.

Motions toward police reform, yet not much follow through, activists say

In July, two months after Floyd’s death, Gov. Walz signed a police accountability bill into law to ban neck restraints and chokeholds.

And, following Floyd’s death, the Minneapolis City Council moved to disband the Minneapolis Police Department and replace it with an overhauled system. But the Minneapolis Charter Commission formally rejected the proposal in November. However, the council voted to cut the police budget for 2021.

Several council members introduced a new proposal in January to eliminate the police department as a charter department and replace it with a new agency that will include police officers and “additional divisions ... to provide for a comprehensive approach to public safety beyond law enforcement.” That proposal is up for review among city officials and may end up on the ballot in November, the StarTribune reported.

Additionally, a petition, led by Yes 4 Minneapolis, aims to get a question on the November ballot to replace the police department with a Department of Public Safety -- an effort some critics like Sam Martinez, an organizer with the Twin Cities Coalition for Justice 4 Jamar, called, "just a name change" and told ABC News: "doesn’t do anything for accountability for police here in our communities."

Martinez's organization was founded following the 2015 police shooting death of Jamar Clark in Minneapolis and has lobbied for police reform every since.

The most recent action towards reform occurred Friday, when the City Council voted to look into creating an unarmed Traffic Safety Division to eliminate “racial disparities in traffic enforcement,” according to Fox9. Wright died during a traffic stop and under this new policy officers who conduct such stops won't be armed with guns.

And on April 12, in Brooklyn Center, city officials also banned local police from using tear gas and chokeholds on protesters, after hundreds flocked to the heavily guarded Brooklyn Center police station on the evening of Wright's death.

The ban, however, does not extend to other law enforcement agencies or the National Guard.

More 'accountability' needed

“If there [were] accountability measures, or we could have community control on a local level, we wouldn't be seeing things ... like Daunte Wrights, or George Floyds,” Martinez said. “We’ve been organizing going on six years since Jamar Clark was killed in 2015 and there’s not been a lot of substantial change as far as statewide or even local legislation.”

Johnathon McClellan, president of the Minnesota Justice Coalition, along with a coalition of community groups in the state, have proposed at least nine police accountability bills that seek to end qualified immunity -- which protects government officials and police officers from lawsuits, strengthen civilian oversight and end police-only responses to mental health crisis calls.

The proposals would also create an independent investigatory and prosecuting body for police critical incidents, repeal the crime of falsely reporting police misconduct, end no-knock warrants, require police to carry professional liability insurance, and require access to body camera footage in critical incidents within 48 hours.

Activists have been trying to meet with Gov. Walz since January but were ignored until last week following Wright's death, Michelle Gross, president of Communities United Against Police Brutality, said to ABC News.

"Now suddenly legislators have some interest in our bills. But we're still getting nonsense from the Senate leadership, saying things like, now's the time to start a conversation. No guys, now's the time for action," Gross said.

“A lot of our bills have made it through the House of Representatives. But that wasn't an easy fight … we're putting together another 10 bills, to try to help change the system,” McClellan said.

McClellan said these bills often get struck down by unmoving Republican opponents.

“It's not like we're asking, we're not asking for a handout. We're asking to live and to be treated with dignity,” McClellan said. “So moving forward, we need to pass meaningful legislation. Anything else is lip service. We need legislation, we need laws that address the cries of the community.”

McClellan also called on Congress to pass the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act, which was passed in the House in March and now sits in the Senate. The bill bans chokeholds, would end qualified immunity for police officers and create a national database of police misconduct.

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(NEW YORK) -- Police departments across the country have released statements in response to the guilty verdict in the Derek Chauvin trial.

In the wake of Chauvin's murder conviction for the death of George Floyd, delivered by the jury on Tuesday, police officials from New York, San Francisco, Minneapolis and Seattle have issued statements to their communities, promising action and ensuring protection for peaceful demonstrations.

New York Police Department Commissioner Dermot Shea issued support for the outcome of the Chauvin trial.

“Justice has been served. NYPD will be out tonight to ensure that peaceful demonstrations have the ability to proceed safely," the department tweeted.

San Francisco Chief of Police William Scott wrote in a Twitter thread on Tuesday that work must be done for police to regain the trust of their communities, and to ensure equity practices of police departments across the country.

“Today’s verdict concludes a criminal trial, but the work of doing justice for George Floyd doesn’t end today. My hope for all of us in criminal justice roles is that we rise to this moment, and learn the lessons that history has frankly been trying to teach us for decades.”

The Minneapolis Police Department Chief of Police Medaria Arradondo called for peace as the Minneapolis community begins to heal, finding some justice almost a year after the death of George Floyd.

"We recognize that our community is hurting, and hearts are heavy with many emotions," he said in a statement. "However, I have hope. The community that I was born and raised in, and that we serve, is resilient and together, we can find our moment to begin to heal. To the Floyd family, may peace and comfort guide you along the way."

"We need calm, safety and peace in our communities, today and in the days to come," Arradondo continued. "We fully respect and support people’s lawful exercise of their first amendment rights. We ask for people to be peaceful and lawful in their actions. Now is the time to use our humanity to lift each other up and not tear our City down."

Other police departments such as the Seattle Police Department have delivered strong statements of support for reform, calling the murder of Floyd a “watershed moment for this country.”

Chauvin was convicted on all charges Tuesday, including second-degree murder, third-degree murder, and second-degree manslaughter. His conviction on all three charges stemming from the May 25, 2020, death of Floyd could lead to a sentence that lasts decades -- and to another court battle.

Chauvin will learn his fate in eight weeks, when Judge Peter Cahill hands down punishment.

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(MINNEAPOLIS) -- Derek Chauvin's conviction on all three charges stemming from the May 25, 2020, death of George Floyd could lead to a sentence that lasts decades -- and to another court battle.

Chauvin will learn his fate in eight weeks, when Judge Peter Cahill hands down punishment to the former police officer who was found guilty on Tuesday of second-degree murder, third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter.

Under Minnesota sentencing guidelines, for a person with no criminal history, each murder charge carries a presumptive sentence of 12 1/2 years, while a manslaughter conviction has a presumptive sentence of four years.

But each count carries a different maximum sentence -- 40 years for second-degree unintentional murder, 25 years for third-degree murder, 10 years for second-degree manslaughter.

Abrams predicted that the prosecution will ask the judge to sentence Chauvin to more years in prison.

Chauvin will be sentenced on the second-degree murder because, per state law, it's the single most serious charge. Although sentencing guidelines suggest it's more likely he could get closer to 15 years, prosecutors likely will argue otherwise, citing aggravating factors -- minors at the scene watched Floyd die, in one example -- that could push 15 years closer to 40.

"That is the next big debate in the case, over exactly what should be the sentence for Derek Chauvin," said ABC News Legal Analyst Dan Abrams, who said he expects the prosecution to push for a longer sentence.

Chauvin was remanded into custody following the jury verdict. During the end of closing arguments, the former officer waived his right to have a jury decide his sentencing. Cahill alone will decide.

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