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Tolga Akmen/Getty Images(LONDON) -- Terminally ill British infant Charlie Gard, whose parents’ fight for his life drew worldwide attention, has died, according to a family spokesperson.

Alison Smith-Squire, a spokeswoman for Charlie's family, said in a statement to ABC News on Friday: "The boy who touched the world has passed away today. [Charlie's mother] Connie [Yates] said: 'Our beautiful little boy has gone, we're so proud of him.'"

After a long and emotional legal battle, Britain's High Court decided Thursday that Charlie should be moved from a hospital to a hospice, where the 11-month-old would be taken off life support and "inevitably" die.

Judge Nicholas Francis issued the order after Charlie's parents and the hospital treating him failed to meet a deadline set by the court to agree on an end-of-life plan that could have kept the incurably ill baby alive for a few more days. The judge ruled that Charlie, whose rare illness damaged his brain and rendered him unable to breathe on his own, would then be transferred to a hospice by the hospital medical team and have his ventilator removed.

The exact timeline of these events and the location of the hospice were kept private by court order.

Great Ormond Street Hospital in London, which was treating Charlie, released a statement Thursday, saying the case has been "a uniquely painful and distressing process for all concerned," and that it regrets it "had to be played out in court over such a protracted period."

"As the judge has now ruled, we will arrange for Charlie to be transferred to a specialist children's hospice, whose remarkable and compassionate staff will support his family at this impossible time," the hospital said Thursday. "Every single one of us wishes there could have been a less tragic outcome."

In court Wednesday, both Charlie's parents and his physicians at Great Ormond Street Hospital agreed that the child should spend his last days in a hospice rather than die at home or in the hospital. But they disagreed over the details on how Charlie would spend the last hours of his life.

Charlie’s family had hoped to assemble a medical team who could move him from Great Ormond Street Hospital to a hospice and supervise the intensive care the infant required so they could spend several days with their son before taking him off life support. But the doctor who had contacted the family offering to help lacked the proper qualifications. The unnamed doctor was a general practitioner with no intensive care experience and no medical team.

The judge then gave Charlie's parents until Thursday to reach an agreement with the hospital if they could not provide a qualified doctor and team.

Yates, Charlie's mother, delivered an emotional statement in court Monday, announcing the reasons behind her and dad Chris Gard's decision to stop pushing to take their son to the United States for potential experimental treatments to prolong his life. Gard read a similar message outside court.

“This is one of the hardest things we’ve ever had to say and we are about to do one of the hardest things we’ve ever had to do,” he told reporters Monday, reading from a sheet of paper.

Gard said that it was no longer in his son's best interest to seek treatment, and that they had decided to let him go and "be with the angels."

"Our son is an absolute warrior," Gard said of his baby. "We will miss him terribly."

An assessment in the United Kingdom from an American doctor who specializes in mitochondrial depletion syndrome, the rare disease from which Charlie suffered, said the baby's condition would not have been improved by the treatments.

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Aamir Qureshi/Getty Images(ISLAMABAD, Pakistan) -- Pakistan Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif has resigned after a ruling by the nation's Supreme Court to disqualify him from office, according to the BBC.

The decision came after an investigation into his family's wealth following the 2015 Panama Papers probe that linked Sharif's children to offshore companies.

Sharif has denied any wrongdoing in the case, according to the BBC.

The five judges reached a unanimous verdict in the Islamabad court, which was filled to capacity, the BBC reports.

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iStock/Thinkstock(PYONGYANG) -- An initial assessment shows that North Korea fired an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) on Friday that traveled 620 miles horizontally into the Sea of Japan, a U.S. official said.

Assessments of the launch, which was detected at about 10:45 a.m. ET, are continuing.

South Korea's joint chief of staff said North Korea launched a missile at 11:41 p.m. local time, according to Yonhap News Agency in South Korea.

The Japanese government said it believes a North Korean missile was launched and then fell into waters off Japan’s coast, in what’s known as the Exclusive Economic Zone. Japan's coast guard is warning ships in the area to look out for debris and alert the government if anything is found, according to NHK, Japan's national public broadcasting organization. A senior Japanese official said the missile flew for approximately 45 minutes.

Friday’s launch is North Korea’s 11th ballistic missile test this year and the first since North Korea launched a historic ICBM on July 4, an action U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson said represented "a new escalation of the threat to the United States, our allies and partners, the region and the world."

That ICBM flew at a trajectory of 1,730 miles above Earth for 37 minutes before crashing into the Sea of Japan.

A U.S. official told ABC News earlier this week that North Korea could test another ICBM as early as Wednesday night.

U.S. officials had suspected a test could occur on July 27 to mark the North Korean holiday known as Day of Victory, which celebrates the end of hostilities in the Korean War in 1953.

But rainy weather at the launch location and technical difficulties appeared to have prevented a launch until late Friday night.

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Anadolu Agency/Getty Images(MOSCOW) -- The U.S. ambassador to Russia has expressed his “strong disappointment and protest” to Russia after it seized two American facilities and called on the U.S. to remove some of its personnel or face expulsion from the country.

The move was Moscow’s way of retaliating one day after the U.S. Senate passed a final sanctions bill that targets Russia, Iran and North Korea, sending it to President Trump’s desk.

“We have received the Russian government notification. Ambassador [John] Tefft expressed his strong disappointment and protest,” a State Department official told ABC News.

In a statement from its Foreign Ministry, Russia said the U.S. must reduce its diplomatic and technical staff to match the number of Russian staff working in America by Sept. 1.

That number is 455, according to Russia, but it is unclear how many Americans are currently serving in Russia. The U.S. embassy in Moscow and the State Department both declined to say. Russian news agency Interfax reported that the U.S. would have to cut “hundreds” of its staff.

The Russian government also seized two American facilities: a recreational country house outside Moscow and a storage facility in the Russian capital.

Trump now faces an even tougher decision. He has long pushed for better relations with Russia, seeking cooperation on issues such as Syria and counterterrorism. He has praised Russian President Vladimir Putin as strong and has spoken highly of their meeting at the G-20 Summit earlier this month.

“Now it is time to move forward in working constructively with Russia!” the president tweeted two days after the meeting.

But in a stunning rebuke by his own party in Congress, Trump must now sign or veto a bill that constricts his ability to amend the sanctions policy while under the cloud of three investigations into his team’s alleged ties to Russia.

The White House has not been clear about what the president will do.

Russia still seems to hold out hope for dialogue with Trump, asking for cooperation despite the strong opposition elsewhere in the U.S. government.

“The latest events confirm that certain circles in the U.S. are fixated on Russophobia and open confrontation with our country,” according to a Foreign Ministry statement. “The Russian Federation has been doing everything in its power to improve bilateral relations, to encourage ties and cooperation with the U.S. on the most pressing issues.”

Russia’s action Friday mirrored the Obama administration’s response to Russia’s cyberattack on the Democratic Party and interference in the 2016 presidential election. In December 2016, Obama ordered the expulsion of 35 Russian diplomats and their families and cut off Russian access to two recreational compounds in New York and Maryland, at least one of which was reportedly used for espionage.

The Russian government had promised retaliation if those compounds were not returned, something the Trump administration has been considering as it holds high-level meetings with its Russian counterparts.

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British Red Cross(LONDON) -- Prince Harry made a private visit Thursday to the British Red Cross to meet with volunteers sorting through donations for victims of London's Grenfell Tower fire.

Harry, 32, was seen in a photograph tweeted by the British Red Cross speaking with volunteers sorting clothes for victims of the June 14 fire that killed at least 80 people.

Thank you His Royal Highness Prince Harry for meeting Red Cross & community volunteers who are helping those affected by the #Grenfell fire. pic.twitter.com/hnYvZ2Vzc8

— British Red Cross (@BritishRedCross) July 28, 2017


Harry met with the volunteers for 50 minutes, according to Kensington Palace.

"Prince Harry wanted to visit the volunteers who have given many hours of their time to help sort through the huge number of donations made to the victims of the Grenfell Tower fire," said a Kensington Palace spokeswoman. "His royal highness was moved to hear how generous the public and businesses have been in donating all kinds of items to those affected; he thanked the teams from the British Red Cross and the Royal Mail who have worked tirelessly to sort through the donations.”

Harry's grandmother, Queen Elizabeth, and brother, Prince William, were applauded when they met last month with firefighters and police at the scene of the fire, which overtook the 24-story Grenfell apartment building.

The Queen and The Duke are meeting members of the emergency services, as well as local residents and community representatives. pic.twitter.com/XxynAXfo6R

— Kensington Palace (@KensingtonRoyal) June 16, 2017


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suprunvitaly/iStock/Thinkstock(CARACAS, Venezuela) -- The U.S. State Department updated its travel warning for Americans in Venezuela on Thursday, and ordered the family of staff members evacuated from the U.S. Embassy in Caracas.

The announced changes come ahead of a vote on Sunday that would establish a National Constituent Assembly. That assembly could allow President Nicolas Maduro to rewrite the country's constitution.

In its travel warming, the State Department cites "social unrest, violent crime, and pervasive food and medicine shortages."

There is fear that the vote on Sunday could prompt protests and/or intensified violence.

State Department staff who choose to remain in Caracas will be subject to travel restrictions and a potential ban on travel after dark.

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Photo by Ali Atmaca/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images(ALEPPO, Syria) -- Nine animals on the brink of starvation have been rescued from an abandoned zoo in war-torn Aleppo, Syria. But more animals remain trapped.

Animal welfare charity Four Paws International said it launched the high-risk operation last Friday and coordinated with security experts to evacuate three lions, two tigers, two Asian black bears and two hyenas from the amusement park Aalim al-Sahar, or "Magic World," with permission from the owner, who had fled to the United States five years ago.

After the Syrian civil war began in 2011 and fighting intensified in Aleppo, the zoo's caretakers were forced to abandon its inhabitants, who are locked in their barren cages and unable to escape the conflict around them. The zoo itself has been severely damaged from shelling, and several animals have either died in the crossfire or starved to death, according to Four Paws veterinarian Amir Khalil who led the dangerous mission.

"The ongoing war has taken its toll on the animals. The lack of water, food, and veterinary care has left the animals physically and psychologically traumatized. Several animals were killed by severe bombings. There was no way for them to escape from this deadly trap,” Khalil said.

Aleppo is now under government control. But just last year, Aleppo was the battlefield of a months-long siege as government forces and opposition groups fought for control over the eastern half of the divided city.

Portions of the city devastated by the conflict are still far from recovery.

“The ever-deteriorating situation of the animals worried us. With our mission, we want to spread the message that humanity cannot be divided and that these suffering animals deserve to be heard and seen," he added. "Also, wild animals, such as bears and big cats, trapped in desolate enclosures can quickly pose a threat to humans.”

Khalil, along with a team of local veterinarians and security advisers, entered the derelict zoo amid the ongoing conflict and loaded the nine animals into cages on transport trucks. The animals were emaciated, dehydrated, exhausted and traumatized, with some suffering from minor wounds, according to Four Paws.

Khalil and his team then hastened the trucks across the Syria-Turkey border where they met other team members. The animals received basic medical care, water and food during their journey, which has been supported by Turkish animal welfare activists.

After a 24-hour road trip through Turkey, the animals arrived safely at an animal protection center in Karacabey, some 70 miles west of the city of Bursa, according to Four Paws.

"The journey across Turkey was a tiring affair for all of us. Due to the extreme heat, we had to stop every three to four hours to check on the conditions of the animals and provide them with water,” Khalil said. “We are thrilled that we were able to bring the animals safely to their first destination.”

While at their temporary home in Karacabey, the animals will receive medical treatment and comprehensive examinations this week, including blood tests, ultrasounds and eye checkups. Once their conditions improve, each animal will be relocated to a permanent, species-appropriate home in a sanctuary, according to Four Paws.

"For the first time, these animals are receiving thorough medical examinations by experts working with sophisticated equipment,” said Frank Göritz, one of the local veterinarians supporting the Four Paws team.

This is not the first time Khalil, a 52-year-old Egyptian native, has helped animals in conflict or disaster zones. He is specifically trained to do so. He saved animals at Libya’s Tripoli Zoo after the 2011 uprising that toppled Muammar Gaddafi and rescued animals from Iraq’s Baghdad Zoo after the 2003 U.S. invasion.

In August 2016 he and his rescue team evacuated all 15 remaining animals at the Khan Younis Zoo, dubbed the worst zoo in the world, in the besieged Gaza Strip. After receiving veterinary attention, the animals were transported to sanctuaries in Jordan, South Africa and elsewhere.

In February, Khalil led a rapid response team from Vienna-based Four Paws to rescue the last two surviving animals from the Montazah al-Morour Zoo in Mosul, the site of a brutal struggle since ISIS took over the Iraqi city in 2014.

On July 10, Iraqi authorities declared "total victory" over the terrorist group in Mosul.

For the other surviving zoo animals still trapped in Aleppo, Khalil said he is determined to return with his team soon to evacuate them, too.

“We are currently working hard with our partners to get the remaining animals out of the zoo," he said. "We are not giving up on the remaining animals."



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Photo by Waring Abbott/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- The Russian lawyer who met with Donald Trump Jr., Jared Kushner and Paul Manafort in Trump Tower is the Russian government's "point person" in fighting U.S. sanctions and took the meeting to discus sanctions relief, a prominent Putin critic told Congress Thursday.

Bill Browder, an American-born financier who worked extensively in Russia, appeared before the Senate Judiciary committee Thursday. He's emerged as a prominent critic of Russian President Vladimir Putin after the death of his former attorney Sergei Magnitsky.

Magnitsky, who died in a Russian jail after accusing Russian government officials of stealing millions of dollars in a tax fraud scheme, is the namesake of the Magnitsky Act sanctions law against human rights violations passed by Congress.

Browder told the panel he has "no doubt" the controversial meeting in Trump Tower in June of 2016 was orchestrated by the Kremlin.

"The interest and the goal in that meeting was to repeal the Magnitsky Act," Browder said. "That's the one thing we can conclude with certainty about what happened in that meeting."

While emails released by President Trump's eldest son indicate that the meeting was arranged after Trump Jr. was promised compromising information on Hillary Clinton, Veselnitskaya told ABC News she attended the meeting to discuss the Magnitsky Act and Russian adoptions.

Kushner and the White House have both said the meeting was about adoptions.

Browder told senators Thursday that the ban on Americans adopting Russians was "retaliation" from Russia after the passage of the Magnitsky Act, and that any conversation about adoptions was tied to sanctions.

"This was a big ask, to go and ask the possible future next president of the United States to repeal a major piece of human rights legislation, they wouldn't have gone in and said please can you repeal this for us without having something to offer in return," he said of the meeting.

Democrats and Republicans in attendance Thursday vowed to keep the existing sanctions in place.

"There is no way that Congress would agree to repeal the Magnitsky Act," Sen. John Cornyn, R-Texas, said.

Browder faced Congress alone Thursday, though the committee had initially invited Manafort and Trump Jr. to appear to discuss their meeting. Both are cooperating with the committee's investigation under threat of subpoena - which Sens. Grassley and Feinstein issued, and later withdrew, for Manafort.

He also testified that opposition research firm Fusion GPS, which funded research for the dossier of unverified allegations against President Trump, also worked separately to lobby against the Magniskty Act.

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the_guitar_mann/iStock/Thinkstock(DAMASCUS, Syria) -- The U.S.-led international coalition fighting ISIS has cut ties with a partner force in Syria who would not commit to fighting only the terrorist organization.

According to Col. Ryan Dillon, spokesman for the coalition, announced the decision Thursday, saying "We cannot support them if they want to pursue objectives other than defeating ISIS." The group, Shohada Al Quartyan, was a "vetted Syrian opposition" group operating in southwestern Syria.

The group is made up of natives from the Hamad desert area.

Col. Dillon did not say who the group was fighting other than ISIS, but said "fighting the regime could be one of those objectives."

The decision marks the first time that the coalition has cut ties with a partner force.  

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ABC News(RAQQA, Syria) -- "Christian," as he calls himself, with his California accent, closely cropped blond hair and tattoos that run across his face and neck, certainly stands out from the crowd in ISIS-controlled Syria.

He grew up in an orphanage in Sonoma, California, and received his military training in the French Foreign Legion.

These days, he's fighting with the Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF), a U.S.-backed group that includes Kurds, Arabs, ethnic Christian groups, Arab-Muslim groups, Christian religious forces and volunteers from around the world in an effort to topple ISIS in Raqqa, Syria, the de facto capital of the terror group's self-declared caliphate.

Christian keeps bullets marked with the names of places where infamous terror attacks perpetrated by ISIS occurred: "Manchester," "San Bernardino," "Orlando" and "Paris."

The names of these cities are printed along the sides of the cartridges he keeps in his bag.

He arrived in the Middle East in 2008, when he said he was first deployed, and developed friendships with many of the Yazidi and Kurdish people he met there.

After the rise of ISIS in 2014, Christian learned that many of his friends were killed by the group, but he insists that his motive for returning to the region isn't simply a matter of enacting revenge.

"This isn’t really a mission of vengeance," he told ABC News about his reason for being in Syria, adding that his motives are more about "justice."

The Syrian Democratic Forces have been trained and equipped by the U.S.-led coalition but do not have heavy weapons, tanks or armored vehicles -- things that were key for Iraqi forces to be able to defeat ISIS in Mosul.

Roughly 500 U.S. ground troops also fill out the region, although their presence is frequently shielded from the media's view. Temporary forces in the region bring the total up to as many as 1,500.

That makes Christian's presence as an armed U.S. fighter in the region closer to the exception than the rule.

For Western volunteers such as Christian who have dedicated themselves to fighting ISIS abroad, their work can sometimes earn them a minor degree of fame. An example is Brace Belden, a former punk rocker who was profiled in New York magazine after joining Kurdish fighters in northern Syria and gaining a large following on social media.

The downside of the work, however, is its inherent danger.

Christian, for his part, is well aware of this.

He said bombs dropped by remote-controlled drones are the biggest threat he currently faces from ISIS, and takes care to position himself in places where they can't get to him easily.
    
He describes these makeshift weapons as "an average $200 Amazon drone" that makes a high-pitched sound and has an explosive attached to them.

Christian told ABC News that he sees hope in the unity of SDF soldiers, and admires the degree to which people of different faiths come together under a common cause through the group.

He said education in the region, coupled with the sense of unity he feels while fighting for the SDF, is the key to defeating ISIS long after the physical turf of their so-called caliphate is eventually reclaimed.

“You have to educate the local people,” he said. “I can kill 100 terrorists with these bullets, but with one book, you can eradicate a whole city’s worth of terrorism."


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iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- The U.S. State Department is cautioning Americans visiting Mexico to be conscious of "allegations that consumption of tainted or substandard alcohol has resulted in illness or blacking out" within the country.
    
The new advisory, posted Wednesday on the U.S. Department of State's Bureau of Consular Affairs website for Mexico, comes after reports of alcohol-related horror stories involving tourists visiting the country have mounted.

“We have seen media reports regarding allegations that consumption of tainted or substandard alcohol has resulted in illness or blacking out in tourist areas in Mexico,” a State Department spokesperson told ABC News in a statement.

The statement added, “Following these reports and in consultation with our posts in Mexico, we updated our country-specific information for Mexico to provide updated safety information regarding potentially tainted alcohol.”

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Photo by Samir Hussein/WireImage(LONDON) -- Prince William is giving up his wings and flying for the final time with the East Anglia Air Ambulance Wednesday evening. On his last day of work, William will cover a night shift.

The Duke of Cambridge began piloting his first operational missions in July 2015 and has been based at Cambridge Airport as part of a team of specialist doctors, critical care paramedics and pilots providing emergency medical services in the most dire of situations.

In a statement issued by Kensington Palace earlier this year, the Duke of Cambridge said, "It has been a huge privilege to fly with the East Anglian Air Ambulance. Following on from my time in the military, I have had experiences in this job I will carry with me for the rest of my life, and that will add a valuable perspective to my Royal work for decades to come."

With Prince Philip announcing his retirement earlier this year, and Queen Elizabeth no longer doing long-haul travel, William and Princess Kate will focus on royal duties full time. The decision coincides with the plans to enroll Prince George at a school full-time in London. Prince George had been attending the Westacre Montessori School near the couple's country home, Anmer Hall.

The 4-year-old, who celebrated his birthday on Saturday, will be starting school at Thomas's Battersea School not far from the couple's base at Kensington Palace. The coeducational school was a surprise choice, with many expecting the couple would send George to Wetherby, a stone's throw from Kensington Palace, which both William and his brother, Prince Harry, attended before leaving for Ludgrove.

Kensington Palace said in a statement that William and Kate were looking forward to George's next milestone: "Their Royal Highnesses are delighted to have found a school where they are confident George will have a happy and successful start to his education."

William and Kate valued the normalcy that the second-in-line's job as an air ambulance pilot and a RAF search and rescue pilot previously in Wales gave them. It allowed the couple to provide George and his sister, Princess Charlotte, with a life away from the spotlight, splitting their time between London and Norfolk. In the statement issued earlier this year, William expressed his thanks for the opportunity.

"I would like to thank the people of East Anglia for being so supportive of my role and for letting me get on with the job when they have seen me in the community or at our region's hospitals," he said.

Just last weekend, William, Kate, George and Charlotte returned from a royal tour in Germany and Poland.

It was George's third royal tour; his first took place as a toddler in 2014 to Australia and New Zealand, and the couple brought both their children for the first time as a family to Canada last fall.

The children are slowly being introduced to their future life as young royals -- earlier this month, Charlotte showed off an adorable curtsy on the red carpet, and both children politely shook the hands of dignitaries.

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PeterHermesFurian/iStock/Thinkstock(PYONGYANG, North Korea) -- North Korea could test another intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) as early as Wednesday night, according to a U.S. official.

If the regime launches an ICBM, it will be the 11th ballistic missile test this year and the first since the nation's historic Fourth of July ICBM test.

U.S. officials have suspected a test could occur on July 27 to mark the North Korean holiday known as "Day of Victory," which celebrates the end of hostilities in the Korean War in 1953.

This next test is expected to be similar to the July 4 test: a KN-20 ICBM launched from Kusong Province. The KN-20, called the Hwasong-14 by North Korea, is a two-stage variant of the KN-17 missile, launched several times by North Korea in April and May.

The July 4 missile was launched into a high-altitude trajectory of 1,730 miles and flew horizontally 577 miles for 37 minutes into the Sea of Japan.

"It is escalatory. It is destabilizing. It is also dangerous," said Pentagon spokesman Capt. Jeff Davis, following the July 4 ICBM test. "This missile flew through busy airspace used by commercial airliners. It flew into space. It landed in Japan's exclusive economic zone, and an area that's used by commercial and fishing vessels. All of this completely uncoordinated."

President Donald Trump tweeted shortly after the ICBM launch, asking if North Korea leader Kim Jong Un had "anything better to do with his life."

"North Korea has just launched another missile. Does this guy have anything better to do with his life? Hard to believe that South Korea and Japan will put up with this much longer. Perhaps China will put a heavy move on North Korea and end this nonsense once and for all!" he said in a series of tweets.

In the days following that message, the president issued conflicting tweets -- at one point chastising China for not doing enough to rein in trade with the rogue regime, but then praising an "excellent meeting" with Chinese President Xi Jinping on North Korea and trade policy.

On Tuesday, The Washington Post, citing an assessment from the Defense Intelligence Agency, reported that North Korea will be able to field a reliable, nuclear-capable ICBM as early as next year, reducing the forecast of the country's ICBM capabilities by two years.

An expert on North Korea's missile program, who declined to be named due to the sensitivity of the issue, told ABC News that moving up the timeline was not surprising, as North Korea's ICBM technology was further along than assessments had predicted.

Still, experts assess that North Korea does not presently have the re-entry technology needed for a nuclear warhead to reach its target, nor does it have the ability to miniaturize a nuclear warhead capable of being mounted on top of an ICBM.

"North Korea's recent test of an intercontinental range ballistic missile -- which was not a surprise to the Intelligence Community -- is one of the milestones that we have expected would help refine our timeline and judgments on the threats that Kim Jong Un poses to the continental United States," said Scott Bray, national intelligence manager for East Asia at the Office for the Director of National Intelligence, in a statement.

"This test, and its impact on our assessments, highlight the threat that North Korea's nuclear and ballistic missile programs pose to the United States, to our allies in the region, and to the whole world," he added. "The Intelligence Community is closely monitoring the expanding threat from North Korea."

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CHRIS RATCLIFFE/AFP/Getty Images(LONDON) -- Britain's High Court has given Charlie Gard's family until noon Thursday to agree with Great Ormond Street Hospital on how the terminally ill infant should be cared for before his death.

Both Charlie's parents and his physicians at Great Ormond Street Hospital in London agreed in court Wednesday that the 11-month-old baby should spend his last days in a hospice, rather than die at home or in the hospital. But they disagreed over the details on how Charlie, whose rare illness has damaged his brain and rendered him unable to breathe on his own, would spend the last hours of his life in the hospice.

Charlie’s parents had hoped to assemble a medical team who could move him from Great Ormond Street Hospital, where he is being treated, to a hospice and supervise the intensive care the child requires so they could spend several days with their son before taking him off life support. But the doctor who had contacted the family offering to help lacked the proper qualifications. The unnamed doctor was a general practitioner with no intensive care experience and no medical team.

If Charlie's family cannot provide a qualified doctor and team, and reach an agreement with the hospital by Thursday at 12 p.m. local time (7 a.m. ET), the judge presiding over the case has ordered that Charlie to be transported to a hospice by the hospital medical team and have his ventilator removed soon after to let him die naturally. The judge ruled that the exact timeline of these events and the location of the hospice remain private by court order.

Charlie's mother, Connie Yates, delivered an emotional statement in court Monday, announcing the reasons behind her and dad Chris Gard's decision to stop pushing to take their son to the United States for potential experimental treatments to prolong his life. Gard read a similar message outside court.

An assessment in the United Kingdom from an American doctor who specializes in mitochondrial depletion syndrome, the rare disease from which Charlie suffers, said the baby's condition was past the time when such treatments would have helped.

On Tuesday, Charlie's family asked the court for permission to let him die at home.

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dk_photos/iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- The U.S. Department of the Treasury announced sanctions against a number of current or former senior members of the Venezuelan government, following an executive order signed by President Donald Trump.

According to the Treasury, the sanctions are a result of the efforts of the 13 individuals being punished for undermining democracy. The sanctions were handed down ahead of an election of a National Constituent Assembly, which could rewrite the nation's constitution and potentially dissolve state institutions.

"A flawed ANC election process all but guarantees that a majority of the Assembly's members will represent the interests of President [Nicolas] Maduro's government," a press release from the Treasury Department states.

"As President Trump has made clear," said Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, "the United States will not ignore the Maduro regime's ongoing efforts to undermine democracy, freedom, and the rule of law."

The sanctions freeze all assets of the individuals named, and prohibit U.S. persons from dealing with them. Those named include four senior officials pursuing the Constituent Assembly elections (Tibisay Lucena Ramirez, Elias Josa Jaua Milano, Tarek William Saab Halabi and Maria Iris Varela Rangel), five current and former senior officials responsible for violence and oppression (Nestor Luis Reverol Torres, Carlos Alfredo Perez Ampueda, Sergio Jose Rivero Marcano, Jesus Rafael Suarez Chourio and Franklin Horacio Garcia Duque), and four current of former officials of Venezuela's state-owed oil company PDVSA and the National Center for Foreign Commerce (CENCOEX).

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