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ABC News(NASHVILLE, Tenn.) -- A young Tennessee boy whose story gained national attention after his mother posted a heart-wrenching video of him addressing his bullies said he is amazed by all the support he's received on social media this week.

Eleven-year-old Keaton Jones said he “never imagined” his story would gain the attention of dozens of celebrities, including Donald Trump Jr., who offered him an invitation to his home.

“All this attention really just feels amazing,” Keaton said in an interview with ABC News’ Good Morning America. “[I’m] speechless, honestly. I did not ever imagine for any of this to happen.

“I think my message is being heard because, I mean, we’ve gone national. So many people are supporting us,” he added.

Keaton became an internet sensation this week after his mother, Kimberly Jones, posted a video on Facebook showing Keaton’s sobbing as he described how he was bullied by classmates, who poured milk over his head, stuffed ham in his clothes and threw bread at him.

“Why do they bully, what's the point of it?" Jones said in the video, which was first posted Friday. "Why do you find joy in taking innocent people and finding a way to be mean to them? It's not OK."

Keaton today said he made the video because he wanted to let people know that bullying is ”a serious thing.”

“I made the video to raise awareness for bullying, not for fame or fortune, it was not at all for that. It was to raise awareness to bullying,” he said. “[It’s] a serious thing that goes on in our society. People criticize other people for the way they look and act; it's not their fault.”

Musicians, actors, TV personalities and athletes have responded to Keaton’s video on social media using the trending hashtag #StandWithKeaton to show their support for the middle school student.

Keaton said the most exciting celebrity response he got was from actor Chris Evans, who urged him to “stay strong” and invited him to Los Angeles to see the premiere of the Marvel Studios-produced “Avengers: Infinity War” next year.

“The most exciting celebrity for me is Chris Evans. I love Captain America,” Keaton said. “It’s been a dream of mine since I was little for Captain America to know who I am.

"Well, he knows who I am,” he added.

So does his Tennessee school district.

“To fulfill our mission of educating all children in Union County Public Schools, we must provide an academic environment that is safe, civil and supportive,” Union County Public Schools director James Carter said in a statement.

“We do not and will not tolerate bullying and have a policy in place that addresses conduct taking place on school grounds, at any school-sponsored activity, on school-provided transportation or at any official school bus stop.”

Meanwhile, Keaton’s mom made an effort to dispute claims that she was using their story to extract money from people. She approved one GoFundMe campaign to be set up in Keaton’s honor, but cautioned that others were fakes.

Jones also addressed allegations that she was racist after pictures surfaced on social media of her holding a Confederate flag.

“I feel like anybody who wants to take the time to ask anybody who I am or even troll through some other pictures, I mean I feel like we're not racist,” Jones said. “I mean, people that know us, know us.”

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ABC News(NEW YORK) --  Unsettled and cold weather is forecast for the Great Lakes and the Northeast through the rest of the week with several rounds of snow.

A general 1 to 3 inches of snow fell in the Midwest and the Great Lakes from the Alberta Clipper system that moved through the area. Locally, more than 6 inches of snow fell due to the lake effect.

Behind the storm system is the coldest air of the season for the East Coast of the U.S.

Winter weather alerts are in place from Florida to Maine.

The storm system is moving into the Northeast on Tuesday morning with snow and rain. Most of the major cities on the I-95 corridor should just see some rain.

By Wednesday, the first clipper system exits the Northeast, but on its heels a new storm system will develop and approach the Great Lakes with more snow.

By Thursday morning, this new system will move into the mid-Atlantic states and could bring some snow from West Virginia to Maryland and into Pennsylvania, New Jersey and maybe even New York City and Long Island. ABC News meteorologists are not expecting much snow with this second system, but a dusting to 1 inch of snow is possible.

Over the next few days some areas from Michigan to western New York and New England could see up to 1 foot of snow.

In addition to the snow, the coldest air of the season is forecast Tuesday in the Great Lakes from Chicago to Detroit. This afternoon, wind chills will struggle to get above zero for the Great Lakes.

This cold blast moves into the Northeast Tuesday night into Wednesday with winds chills in the single digits and teens from Washington, D.C. to Boston.

Extreme dry weather

Extremely dry conditions and some gusty winds in Southern California has led the National Weather Service to extend the red flag warning for Ventura and Los Angeles counties through Wednesday.

The relative humidity could be lower than 5 percent in some areas.

Generally, dry offshore flow will continue for Southern California through Wednesday. Winds will not be as gusty as they were last week, but we cannot rule out a few gusts near 30 mph at times.

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) --  The Winter Jewish holiday known as the Festival of Lights begins at sundown December 12th.

Jewish people around the world celebrate this traditional holiday that lasts eight nights. The festival is not a “High Holy Day,” like Yom Kippur or Rosh Hashanah, but is a joyful celebration that recounts the story of a miracle.

What Hanukkah celebrates


Also known as the Festival of Lights, Hanukkah commemorates the story of the Maccabees, or Jewish fighters, and their victory over the Syrian-Greek army, according to Chabad.org.

According to the Torah, the Maccabees reclaimed the Holy Temple in Jerusalem and cleared it of idols that had been placed inside by the Syrians, a practice forbidden in Jewish law. The Maccabees wanted to light the temple’s seven-branched candelabrum, or Menorah, but realized they only had enough holy oil for one night. According to the story, a miracle happened and the oil lasted for eight days, allowing enough time to prepare new oil in the religious tradition. Now, Jewish people commemorate the miracle by lighting a Hannuhkiah, a special type of menorah that has eight regular candles and one special candle.

How Hanukkah is observed


The holiday begins on the evening of Kislev 25 in the Jewish lunar calendar, which generally falls sometime between late November and late December.

The Shamash, or special “attendant” candle, is lit first each night. It is then used to light all the other candles. On the first night, the Shamash would be used to light one other candle, on the second night, the Shamash is used to light the first and second candles, and so on. This continues every night until the eighth and final night of Hanukkah. Special prayers are said when lighting the candles and the lit Hannukiah is placed in a doorway or window.

To honor the miracle of the holy oil, Jewish people eat foods fried in oil. Latkes or potato pancakes paired with applesauce and sour cream, or jelly doughnuts are favorites at Hanukah celebrations.

Gifts are often exchanged on each night of Hanukkah, though this is more of a modern tradition, which many believe is inspired by other winter holidays where gifts are exchanged like Christmas, Kwanzaa and Three Kings Day.

Hanukkah games

Jewish children play with a “dreidel,” a four sided spinning top with Hebrew letters on each side. The letters spell out an acronym for “a great miracle happened here” and include Nun, Gimmel, Hei and Shin. In this game, each player starts with the same amount of playing pieces, typically chocolate coins called “gelt,” which take the place of real money. Players take turns spinning the dreidel and follow the instructions indicated by the letter the dreidel lands on. To start, each player places one piece of gelt in the center pot.

 These are the instructions for each letter:

  • Nun: “nothing” Nothing happens
  • Gimmel: “everything” the player takes the whole pot
  • Hei: “half” the player takes half the pot
  • Shin: “put in” the player places one piece in the pot

When a player is out of playing pieces, he or she may borrow a piece from a neighbor. The game is over when one player has all of the pieces.

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iStock/Thinkstock(HOUSTON) -- A man in Texas has been arrested and charged with supporting ISIS, according to the U.S. Department of Justice. Kaan Sercan Damlarkaya, an 18-year-old U.S. citizen from Houston, was charged with unlawfully distributing explosives information and attempting to provide material support to ISIS in a criminal complaint unsealed Monday morning.

According to the charges, Damlarkaya engaged in online communications with undercover FBI agents who he believed were ISIS supporters beginning in August.

He allegedly discussed his intentions to travel overseas and fight for ISIS. According to the criminal complaint, Damlarkaya attempted to go to Syria twice but failed.

He also allegedly stated that if he was not able to go abroad to fight for ISIS, he would plan an attack in the United States. In his correspondence, he allegedly provided a formula for the explosive Triacetone Triperoxide (TATP), and how to use it in a pressure cooker with shrapnel.

Damlarkaya allegedly asked the undercover FBI agents if he could provide a farewell video to inspire others if he followed through with an attack that resulted in his death.

Additionally, he provided instructions on how to build an AK-47 or AR-15 assault rifle from readily available parts in order to avoid detection from authorities. He even discussed potentially using a machete or samurai sword as weapons.

Damlarkaya explained to the supposed ISIS supporters, “If I buy a gun or supplies for a bomb, [law enforcement] will heat up pressure [j]ust like a few months ago when I was trying an operation but they found out.”

The criminal complaint against Damlarkaya says that he carried a knife wherever he went to protect himself from law enforcement. He also allegedly slept with a machete under his pillow in case his house was raided.

He faces a maximum 20-year prison sentence.

Damlarkaya was arrested last Friday and is being held pending a detention hearing on Dec. 14. The investigation into Damlarkaya was conducted by the FBI’s Joint Terrorism Task Force.

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iStock/Thinkstock(LOS ANGELES) --  As the Claffey family packed up what they could from their home in Carpinteria, California, 5-year-old Mazie Claffey begged to bring along the Christmas tree.

"This fire's really ruining my daughter's Christmas," Mazie's mom, Maureen Claffey, joked ABC News. "We keep joking that it's going to be a white Christmas ... the mountain is just white with ash."

The Claffey family were told to evacuate in the middle of the night as the massive Thomas fire draws nearer to their home.

The fire, the worst of five wildfires currently burning in California, grew by more than 50,000 acres on Sunday, making it the fifth-largest wildfire in the state's history, fire officials said. So far, officials estimate the Thomas fire has charred about 230,500 acres, the equivalent of about 360 square miles. It has consumed 794 structures and damaged about 190 others, with 18,000 buildings still at risk.

On Monday, the Claffey family packed up their home, grabbing their most important keepsakes. Though they couldn't pack the Christmas tree, they did grab their stockings, which were hand-knit by family members.

James Claffey focused on "material that has memories and can't be replaced" -- his mother's recipe books and childhood photographs.

"Everything else is transient and you can replace it," James Claffey said.

He added: "As long as we have the child, the wife and the whiskey all will be well!” Said the Irish transplant.

Maureen Claffey packed her wedding dress and jewelry. Her family has been farming in the area since the 1860s, she told ABC News.

"I've never seen anything like this before," she said. "It's kind of a slow-moving disaster."

She added: "You don't really know when life is gonna resume back to normal."

There is a silver lining, though. "[We've been] spending a lot of time together as a family," Maureen Claffey said. "Everyone’s been safe, our family's all safe."

As for Mazie, she couldn't take the tree but did manage to grab her favorite stuffed animals. "I brought all of my seals!" she told ABC News.

The little girl made sure to show her gratitude to the officials helping her family as well, drawing a colorful sign that read, "Thank you, firefighters!"

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Even as panicked commuters rushed toward them, four officers didn't hesitate to engage the man accused of detonating an explosive in the New York City subway system this morning, leaping on top of the suspect and removing the device before more damage could be done.

The explosion occurred in an underground passageway near the Port Authority Bus Terminal, sending commuters scrambling to evacuate a major transit hub just blocks from Times Square. Despite the rush-hour crowds, only five people suffered minor injuries, officials said.

The 27-year-old suspect, Akayed Ullah, is in the hospital, badly injured in the arm and torso from the device that went off in his arms, law enforcement sources said.

Port Authority Police Department Officer Anthony Manfredini apprehended Ullah, with the help of three other officers: Sean Gallagher, Jack Collins and Drew Preston, Port Authority Police Benevolent Association President Paul Nunziato told ABC News Monday evening.

Manfredini was stationed just outside the corridor where the detonation occurred. He "saw the panic and commotion," radioed for help and then entered the corridor with the three other officers, Nunziato said.

"They engaged the suspect, who was on the ground, they handcuffed him, they saw wires, cellphone. They made a split-second decision to actually get on top of him and restrain him, and [Manfredini] actually removed the device off of his person before he could further detonate it," Nunziato said.

Nunziato praised the officers for their quick action. "It's a split-second decision based on training. Training and having the moxie to get in there, to put your life on the line. ... I'm extremely proud. They couldn’t have done it any better."

He added: "Those four guys are heroes."

 A law enforcement source said the bomb was built from a 12-inch-long pipe, black powder and rigged with a 9-volt battery and a wire that came from a Christmas light. Because it was strapped to the suspect, the assumption is he had been prepared to die a suicide bomber, the source said. The pipe had nails stuffed into it, the source said, and it had the ability to impose more injuries than it did.

“This could have been worse,” a law enforcement source told ABC News.

However, the pipe did not fully shatter and a 6-inch piece was discovered fully intact.

Ullah, originally from Bangladesh, told authorities he is self-inspired from ISIS online propaganda, sources said. Ullah told authorities no one directed him to carry out the attack and he talked about the plight of Muslims over the years, a law enforcement source said.

Video of the incident, shot by a surveillance camera, shows commuters walking in the passageway when the explosion erupts. The camera screen filled with smoke as people scattered.

Ullah was not expected to be charged Monday but eventually is set to face terror-related federal charges, a law enforcement source said.

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- A man accused of detonating an explosive in the New York City subway system Monday morning had the bomb strapped to him while he rode in from Brooklyn to Manhattan before the attack, a law enforcement source said.

The explosion occurred in an underground passageway near the Port Authority Bus Terminal and, despite the rush-hour crowds, only three people suffered minor injuries, officials said. New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo called the explosion “one of our worst nightmares.” 

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo  called the explosion “one of our worst nightmares.” New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio called it an "attempted terrorist attack."

Cuomo said on CNN that the homemade device only partially detonated, explaining that the bomb was in a pipe that itself did not explode.

Authorities called it an "improvised low-tech explosive device" that was attached to the suspect with hook-and-loop fasteners and zip ties.

A law enforcement source said the bomb was built from a 12-inch long pipe, black powder and rigged with a 9-volt battery and a wire that came from a Christmas light. Because it was strapped to the suspect, the assumption is he had been prepared to die a suicide bomber, the source said. The pipe had nails stuffed into it, the source said, and it had the ability to impose more injuries than it did.

“This could have been worse,” a law enforcement source told ABC News.

However, the pipe did not fully shatter and a 6-inch piece was discovered fully intact. 

The 27-year-old suspect, Akayed Ullah, is in the hospital, badly injured in the arm and torso from the device that went off in his arms, sources said. Ullah, originally from Bangladesh, told authorities he is self-inspired from ISIS online propaganda, sources said.

Ullah entered the United States from Bangladesh seven years ago on a family-based visa and has an address in Brooklyn, sources said. The explosive was assembled in his apartment, sources said.

Authorities called the explosive an "improvised low-tech explosive device" that was based on a pipe bomb and was attached to the suspect with Velcro and zip ties.

Video of the incident, shot by a surveillance camera, shows commuters’ walking in the passageway when the explosion erupts. The camera screen filled with smoke as people scattered.

Christina Bethea, 29, told ABC News she was in the passageway on her way to work next to the terminal when she heard a bang, saw smoke and ran.

"If I didn’t believe in God, I believe in God today," she said, adding that she commuted from Yonkers, New York.

Alfonso Chavez -- brother of Veronica Chavez, who was hospitalized after today’s attack -- told ABC News that his sister is doing better but still feeling the after-effects of the explosion. Veronica Chavez was on her way to work when the bomb detonated. She told her brother that she first heard the explosion and then saw dust and smoke.

When the smoke settled, she saw two to three bodies on the floor along with some debris, her brother said she told him. She froze for a second, then ran, falling to the ground as she went before finally reaching an exit, Alfonso Chavez said.

The explosion in the subway system -- ridden by 6 million people each day -- occurred at about 7:20 a.m.

Port Authority Police Department Officer Jack Collins, who was undercover at the time looking for children being trafficked at the bus terminal, apprehended Ullah, with the help of three other officers: Sean Gallagher, Anthony Manfredini and Drew Preston.

Manfredini noticed alarmed commuters running from the suspect, who was already on the ground after having detonated the device, said Robert Egbert, a spokesman for the Port Authority police union.

The officers then reached the wounded suspect and saw what appeared to be wires coming out of his clothing, Egbert said. Ullah appeared to be reaching for a cellphone, Egbert said, and the officers held him at gunpoint and cuffed him after a brief struggle. The officers didn't fire their weapons, Egbert said.

On Monday evening, Port Authority Police Benevolent Association President Paul Nunziato praised the officers for their quick action. "Those four guys are heroes," he told ABC news.

"Thank God the perpetrator did not achieve his ultimate goals," New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio said.

New York City has long been a target of terrorist attacks. Since Sept. 11, about 26 “plots” in New York City have been prevented, officials said this morning.

There are no credible and specific threats against New York City at this time, officials said.

The bus terminal was temporarily closed but has since reopened. Subways were bypassing the terminal and Times Square stations.

Secretary of Homeland Security Kirstjen Nielsen said in a statement, “The Department of Homeland Security is taking appropriate action to protect our people and our country in the wake of Monday’s attempted terrorist attack."

"We will continue to assist New York authorities with the response and investigation and we urge the public to remain vigilant and report any suspicious activity," Nielsen said. "More broadly, the administration continues to adopt significant security measures to keep terrorists from entering our country and from recruiting within our borders."

Monday's explosion comes less than two months after a native of Uzbekistan plowed a truck into a crowd on a lower Manhattan bike path, killing eight. He was allegedly inspired by ISIS videos he'd watched on his cellphone.

President Donald Trump said in a statement that Monday's attack "once again highlights the urgent need for Congress to enact legislative reforms to protect the American people."

"America must fix its lax immigration system, which allows far too many dangerous, inadequately vetted people to access our country," Trump said. "Today’s terror suspect entered our country through extended-family chain migration, which is incompatible with national security. My executive action to restrict the entry of certain nationals from eight countries, which the Supreme Court recently allowed to take effect, is just one step forward in securing our immigration system. Congress must end chain migration.

"Congress must also act on my administration’s other proposals to enhance domestic security, including increasing the number of Immigration and Customs Enforcement officers, enhancing the arrest and detention authorities for immigration officers, and ending fraud and abuse in our immigration system," he said.

Trump also added "those convicted of engaging in acts of terror deserve the strongest penalty allowed by law, including the death penalty in appropriate cases. America should always stand firm against terrorism and extremism, ensuring that our great institutions can address all evil acts of terror."

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Stephanie Keith/Getty Images(NEW YORK) --  The family of the man accused of detonating an explosive in the New York City subway system Monday morning said they are "heartbroken" by the allegations.

The explosion occurred in an underground passageway near the Port Authority Bus Terminal, sending commuters scrambling to evacuate a major transit hub just blocks from Times Square. Despite the rush-hour crowds, only five people suffered minor injuries, officials said.

The 27-year-old suspect, Akayed Ullah, is in the hospital, badly injured in the arm and torso from the device that went off in his arms, law enforcement sources said.

"We are heartbroken by the violence that was targeted at our city today, and by the allegations being made against a member of our family," the family said in a statement, which was read in front of the Ullah family's home in Brooklyn by Albert Fox Cahn, legal director for Council on American-Islamic Relations-New York.

"But we are also outraged by the behavior of law enforcement officials who have held children as small as 4 years old out in the cold and who held a teenager out of high school classes to interrogate him without a lawyer, without his parents," the statement continued. "These are not the sorts of actions that we expect from our justice system, and we have every confidence that our justice system will find the truth behind this attack and that we will, in the end, be able to learn what occurred today."

It's not clear who the children and the teenager referred to in the statement are.

Ullah, originally from Bangladesh, told authorities he is self-inspired from ISIS online propaganda, sources said. Ullah told authorities no one directed him to carry out the attack and he talked about the plight of Muslims over the years, a law enforcement source said.

Ullah entered the United States from Bangladesh seven years ago on a family-based visa and has an address in Brooklyn, sources said. The explosive was assembled in his apartment, sources said.

Video of the incident, shot by a surveillance camera, shows commuters walking in the passageway when the explosion erupts. The camera screen filled with smoke as people scattered.

Christina Bethea, 29, told ABC News she was in the passageway on her way to work next to the terminal when she heard a bang, saw smoke and ran.

"If I didn’t believe in God, I believe in God today," she said, adding that she commuted from Yonkers, New York.

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ABC News(LOS ANGELES) -- The Thomas Fire, the worst of five wildfires currently burning in California, grew by more than 50,000 acres on Sunday, making it the fifth-largest wildfire in the state's history, fire officials said.

The inferno just north of Los Angeles in Ventura and Santa Barbara counties is being fought by about 6,400 firefighters.

It’s been a witch's brew fueled by lush vegetation, powerful Santa Ana winds and the region's extremely warm weather and dry conditions.

So far, officials estimate the Thomas Fire has charred about 230,500 acres, the equivalent of about 360 square miles. It has consumed 794 structures and damaged about 190 others, with 18,000 buildings still at risk.

The peril of the blaze, which has burned wildly for a week, has prompted the evacuation of tens of thousands of residents.

In Santa Barbara County alone, more than 30,000 residents were forced from their homes under evacuation warnings.

Perhaps most critical is that the Santa Ana winds persist, keeping firefighters struggling with gusts at around 35 to 45 mph, Cal Fire officials confirmed.

However, in a promising turn, despite the fire’s perimeter spreading over the weekend, the Thomas Fire is now back to 15 percent contained -- up slightly from Sunday evening.

The state has spent more than $34 million on efforts to suppress the Thomas fire, which has also knocked out electricity for thousands of area residents, authorities said.

 "[We're] facing a new reality in the state," California Gov. Jerry Brown said Saturday as he surveyed damage in Ventura County. "It's a horror and a horror we need to recover from."

He said drought and climate change have exacerbated the wildfires.

 From now on in California, Brown said, fires are going to be more "intense" and a greater danger to lives and property.

"Individuals need to come together to make our communities livable," he said.

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iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) --  The Pentagon is preparing to allow transgender individuals to enlist in the U.S. military beginning Jan. 1 in compliance with a federal court ruling from two weeks ago.

On Monday, the court denied an emergency stay issued by the Trump administration to delay that court order. While the administration continues appealing that decision, the Pentagon is preparing in the meantime to let transgender individuals join the military if they meet certain guidelines.

The Pentagon’s compliance only applies to allowing transgender individuals seeking to join the military to enlist. Separate court actions have temporarily halted the implementation of the Trump administration's reinstatement of a ban on transgender service members that was to have been phased into place this spring.

“As required by recent federal district court orders, the Department of Defense recently announced it will begin processing transgender applicants for military service on January 1, 2018,” said a Defense Department statement issued Monday. “This policy will be implemented while the Department of Defense appeals those court orders.”

The Pentagon will comply with the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia's order that it implement the guidelines issued by former Defense Secretary Ash Carter in 2016 when he lifted the ban on transgender service members in the military.

Under those guidelines, applicants will be allowed to join if a medical provider certifies they have been stable without “clinically significant distress or impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning” for 18 months.

Similarly, a licensed medical provider must certify that an applicant “has completed all medical treatment associated with the applicant's gender transition, the applicant has been stable in the preferred gender for 18 months, and if presently receiving cross-sex hormone therapy post-gender transition, the individual has been stable on such hormones for 18 months.”

Applicants who have completed sex reassignment or genital reconstruction surgery must have a licensed medical provider certify that “a period of 18 months has elapsed since the date of the most recent surgery, no functional limitations or complications persist, and no additional surgeries are required.”

"Transgender individuals receiving hormone therapy also must be stable on their medication for 18 months."

"As of right now, they are simply complying with a court order and a previous policy to remain in compliance," White House Press Secretary Sarah Sanders said during Monday's White House briefing. "The Department of Justice is currently reviewing the legal options to ensure that the president's directive can be implemented, and for anything further, any specifics on both of those matters, I refer you to the Department of Defense and Justice."

The lawsuit moving through federal court was filed on behalf of transgender service members two weeks after President Trump tweeted in July that transgender individuals would not be allowed in the U.S. military "in any capacity" because of the "tremendous medical costs and disruption."

On Aug. 25, Trump formally signed a memorandum directing the Pentagon to ban transgender individuals from serving. The directive gave the Department of Defense six months to develop an implementation plan that will go into effect on March 23, 2018.

Former defense secretary Ash Carter lifted the ban on transgender service members in June 2016 and put in place a one-year review of how transgender recruits could join the military by the following summer.

Current defense secretary James Mattis extended that study in July of this year by six months, however, Trump's new policy directive has put into question what will happen to current transgender service members and those individuals hoping to serve.

As recently as last week, Chief Pentagon spokesperson Dana White said the Pentagon was continuing with its panel that would provide recommendations to Mattis, by February, for how to handle the cases of transgender individuals already in uniform.

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- Surveillance video caught the dramatic moment an explosive device was detonated in the New York City subway system during Monday morning's rush hour, sending panicked commuters scrambling to evacuate.

The video shows commuters walking in the underground passageway near the Port Authority Bus Terminal when the explosion erupts. The camera screen filled with smoke as people fled for safety.

As the smoke clears, the suspect is seen lying on the ground.

The 27-year-old suspect, Akayed Ullah, is in the hospital, badly injured in the arm and torso from the device that went off in his arms, sources said. Ullah, originally from Bangladesh, told authorities he is self-inspired from ISIS online propaganda, sources said.

Christina Bethea, 29, told ABC News she was in the passageway on her way to work when she heard a bang, saw smoke and ran.

Despite the crowds, only three people suffered minor injuries, officials said.

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo called the explosion “one of our worst nightmares.” New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio called it an "attempted terrorist attack."

Cuomo said on CNN that the homemade device only partially detonated, explaining that the bomb was in a pipe that itself did not explode. Authorities called it an "improvised low-tech explosive device" that was attached to the suspect with Velcro and zip ties.

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Courtesy Columbia County Sheriff's Office (NEW YORK) --  A high school soccer coach who allegedly ran away with a 17-year-old girl is being extradited to Florida, an official told ABC News Monday.

Rian Rodriguez, 27, had been in custody in upstate Onondaga County, New York, on a Florida warrant for alleged custodial interference since 17-year-old Caitlyn Frisina was found safe in New York with him earlier this month. He's now been released from the Onondaga County Jail to be extradited to Florida, where he lives, said Jon Seeber of the Onondaga County Sheriff's Office.

A spokesperson for the Columbia County Detention Facility in Florida confirmed to ABC News that Rodriguez is heading to the jail, but the spokesperson declined to say when he is expected to arrive due to security reasons. 

Frisina was reported missing from her Florida home on Nov. 26, sparking a massive search. She and Rodriguez -- a family friend and assistant soccer coach at the teen's Florida high school -- were found in a car together in Syracuse six days later.

Frisina has since been reunited with her parents.

Chuck Keller, the Syracuse-based attorney representing Rodriguez in New York, told ABC News last week, “I can say that my client maintains his innocence of any charges and has consented to be extradited back to Florida as soon as possible so that he can clear up the matters there."

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Christina Bethea was on her way to her security guard job in Midtown Manhattan early Monday morning.

But she never made it to work.

The 29-year-old had arrived at the massive Port Authority terminal after taking a bus from her home in Yonkers north of the city and then a city subway. She was about to walk out of the transit hub to her job.

“I walked down the stairs to go through the pathway that connects to the Port Authority and when I got to the end of it I heard a noise that went ‘boom’,” she told ABC News. “It sounded like a big gunshot. One time.”

The explosive sound was the result of what authorities are calling "an attempted terrorist attack" that injured three people.

A 27-year-old suspect "intentionally detonated" an improvised, low-tech explosive device that was based on a pipe bomb and was attached to the suspect with Velcro and zip ties, authorities said. Three people were injured.

Bethea heard the sound first. Then she saw smoke.

“I saw that so I started running to get out of there,” she said. “I didn’t know what was going on.”

She said others also fled at the sound of an explosion and smoke.

“We all just ran,” she said. “We all ran up the steps, and someone said, ‘What the hell was that?’”

Police arrived quickly, she said.

“Not even two minutes passed and all the police rushed into the Port Authority,” she said.

After calling her family and her best friend, Bethea heard the news that the explosion and smoke were from a detonated device.

Realizing she survived what may have been an attempted bombing, Bethea decided to head back home.

“It shakes you up,” she said. “If I didn’t believe in God, I believe in God today,”

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iStock/Thinkstock(NEWTOWN, Conn.) -- Five years after a mass shooting at a Connecticut elementary school horrified the nation, some family members of victims reflected on how their lives have changed since the tragedy, as they work together to prevent future acts of gun violence.

"We simply don't want other parents to be in our position. We know that these acts of violence are preventable," Nicole Hockley, whose son, Dylan, was killed at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown five years ago, told ABC News' Amy Robach. "We feel responsible to teach people how to prevent them from happening."

Hockley recalled how her Dylan, who had autism, loved to pretend to he was a butterfly.

"He would flap his arms up and down whenever he got excited, which was pretty much all the time, and I asked him once, 'Why do you flap?' and he said, 'because I'm a beautiful butterfly,'" she said.

"At his funeral I talked about how the theory of a butterfly flapping its wings on one side of the world can cause a hurricane on the other side," Hockley said. "I thought about Dylan as our butterfly to help create change in our country, positive, transformative change."

Hockley co-founded the Sandy Hook Promise, a nonprofit organization that uses educational programs to help prevent acts of gun violence before they occur.

The community of Newtown was thrust into the national spotlight five years ago this week when it was rocked by tragedy after a gunman opened fire at Sandy Hook Elementary School. Twenty students -- between the ages of 6 and 7 -- and six educators were killed.

The shooting drew many immediate calls for reform or action to prevent a similar tragedy from ever happening again. Just this October, however, the U.S. suffered the deadliest mass shooting in history when a gunman killed 59 people at a country music festival in Las Vegas, Nevada.

Mark Barden, who also co-founded Sandy Hook Promise after his son, Daniel, was killed at the elementary school, told ABC News that he "made a very deliberate decision to invest every fiber of my being into trying to prevent that from happening again."

Barden recalled his son as "an exceptionally sweet, compassionate little soul."

"My one little Daniel has in his life affected so many people in a positive way, but in his murder I can't even tell you," Barden said.

"We're training people, students, parents, teachers, how to recognize the warning signs that people give off before they hurt themselves before they hurt someone else," Barden said.

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iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- A body found Sunday in a wooded area in a suburb of Washington, D.C., has been identified as that of a 17-year-old boy who went missing a day earlier, according to police.

The body of Navid Nicholas Sepehri, a senior at Walt Whitman High School in Bethesda, Maryland, was found in a wooded area in the city that is about 20 minutes northeast of the nation's capital, Montgomery County police said in a statement.

Sepehri was reported missing after he failed to return home Saturday night, according to the statement.

Walt Whitman High School's principal confirmed the teen was a senior at the school in an email to parents and students Sunday night, according to ABC affiliate WJLA in Washington.

Police said the cause of death is still under investigation.

Montgomery County police are asking anyone with information on the case to call its major crimes division.

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WJTN Headlines for Tuesday Dec. 12, 2017

Most of Western New York is now under a Lake Effect Snow Warning through 7 p.m. Wednesday, including Chautauqua and Cattaraugus Counties.    That from the National Weath...

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